PDA

View Full Version : Rhapsody music service


Yontsey
2006-01-04, 16:12
Does anyone use Rhapsody music service and/or is it even available on Macs? I was curious how well it works and how good the music selection is. I've read some reviews and such but I'm one of those people who like to find out thing straight from the horses mouth so to speak. I like to actually ask people and get personalized reviews. I like the fact that it's only like $8-10/month, something like that, and it's unlimited downloads. I personally wish that iTMS would go to this kind of format where it would just be unlimited downloads and make it like $10-15/month, I would be first in line to purchase it. But back to my point, any thoughts on Rhapsody?

Brad
2006-01-04, 16:34
No, Rhapsody isn't available for Mac users.

Remember, of course, that those "unlimited downloads" stop working the moment your membership ends. So, if you have a year's membership, at the end of the year you'd spend $120 with nothing to show for it.

Yontsey
2006-01-04, 16:40
I understand, but at the same time, you can download full cd's or enough singles to equal a full cd (say 12-14 songs). When you download at least 1 cd, it'll be the same price as the month membership and you can keep downloading and downloading so therefore say you download 10 cd's in 1 month, you wouldve saved yourself over $100 in one month or have already covered the price of your year membership. I would hardly say you have nothing to show for it. Maybe thats just me though.

Franz Josef
2006-01-04, 16:45
Renting music looks like an odd approach as Brad says above. For those looking for a rental service for PCs, Yahoo is probably a better bet. If rental does take off, there's little to prevent Apple from offering the service. Many analysts are expecting Rhapsody to be pulled by Real sooner rather than later.

I would hardly say you have nothing to show for it. Maybe thats just me though.It's an annuity though - you must pay forever to keep the music.

Yontsey
2006-01-04, 16:54
Wait.....maybe I'm misunderstanding the whole concept of these unlimited download services. Once you download the song in the term of the service, you don't own it? I had no idea that it was just "rental" and that you had to keep paying for the service in order to keep the songs. I was thinking once you downloaded it, it was yours to keep but I guess i was way off. If thats the case, then there's no chance in hell I would do these services.

709
2006-01-04, 17:06
I just experienced 'eMusic' for the first time (got some '100 MP3S 4 TEH FREE' bullshit in a pack of Verbatim discs), and I have to say it was pretty damn easy. The mp3s are encoded at anywhere from 180-250 VBR, and they don't sound half bad. The music selection is pretty bleak (took me nearly an hour to find 100 songs that I'd like), but once it's downloaded it's there for good.

Of course I cancelled my trial after the 100 songs were safely tucked away, but the subscription services (anywhere from 40-90 songs a month for 10-20 bucks) don't seem like a bad deal at all if you're into downloading your music.

Franz Josef
2006-01-04, 17:08
Unless it's changed very recently (and I don't believe it has), Rhapsody requires the user to have a current subscription to use the service.

Yontsey
2006-01-04, 17:20
So if i understand yall correctly, that means once your subscription is up, you lose all the music you downloaded????

Franz Josef
2006-01-04, 17:22
That's right. It's rental not ownership.

709
2006-01-04, 17:32
Hmm. From what I can gather from Rhapsody's site, a lot of the music you select isn't downloaded so much as it is streamed. There is a downloading option for certain songs, but they 'may incur an additional fee'. :err:

I don't know, in reading through their EULA the whole thing feels kind of sketchy.

Oh, and apparently the service is available for 10.3.9 and Tiger users (US only).

Brad
2006-01-04, 17:42
So if i understand yall correctly, that means once your subscription is up, you lose all the music you downloaded????
Was I not clear enough? ;)

After you stop paying to keep up the subscription, you literally can not play anything you'd downloaded as part of the subscription.

Phoenix
2006-01-04, 18:08
Was I not clear enough? ;)

After you stop paying to keep up the subscription, you literally can not play anything you'd downloaded as part of the subscription.

I was just wondering what measures are in place to stop you playing the music once you've stopped the subscription?

chucker
2006-01-04, 18:17
I was just wondering what measures are in place to stop you playing the music once you've stopped the subscription?

DRM, i.e. encryption.

(If the files are on your drive to begin with. For mere streaming, they're not.)

atomicbartbeans
2006-01-04, 18:19
I was just wondering what measures are in place to stop you playing the music once you've stopped the subscription?
Bounty hunters with night vision goggles and lasers and stuff. :err:

Yontsey
2006-01-04, 18:23
Bounty hunters with night vision goggles and lasers and stuff. :err:

Dog the Bounty Hunter?

atomicbartbeans
2006-01-04, 18:26
Dog the Bounty Hunter?
Nah, he uses iTMS. :)

Yontsey
2006-01-04, 18:39
touche

Brad
2006-01-04, 21:04
I was just wondering what measures are in place to stop you playing the music once you've stopped the subscription?
As chucker said, the answer is DRM. DRM is the acronym for Digital Rights Management. DRM technologies can limit access, distribution, and copying of files based on a set of limits such as assigned user, date, number of accesses, type of device, etc. In this case, the files you download from Rhapsody are encrypted using Windows Media 10 DRM and have a timeout which needs to be periodically refreshed by the subscription service.

DRM is an evil, evil concept and generally stomps all over existing Fair Use laws. The big media conglomerates and associates (RIAA & MPAA) are trying to completely cut away any abilities you have to freely watch and listen to media that you "own" and that you "bought" from them. Would you believe that even broadcast television is soon going to have DRM as well? Unless things change soon, you'll only be allowed to record certain TV shows on your VCR/DVR and some shows will expire and automatically delete themselves after a few days or after you watch it X number of times.

I could cite all sorts of scary examples that would utterly shock the Average Joe. The problem is that it's being slowly and quietly introduced in small doses so that Average Joe doesn't realize his former rights have been stripped away. MacroVision started it a couple decades ago. Regioned and CSSed DVDs furthered it. In the past couple of years, we've gotten DRMed music download services. Now, we have CDs that are installing rootkits.

Technology is being put in place so that DRM simply cannot be avoided. Soon we will have an all-digital circuit from the input (computer, music/video player) to the output devices (monitors and speakers) so that we cannot have anything between to re-record the signals unless that third device is authenticated and "allowed" to record according to the original content's DRM.

Even attempting to circumvent these kings of protection is a federal crime in the US under the DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act).

The only reason it's taking so long is because so many legacy devices still need to be supported. With the push of new tech like digital television, the government and media associations hope to accelerate the process.

Sorry for the rant. It's a touchy subject.

atomicbartbeans
2006-01-04, 21:12
But Brad... how do we stop the onslaught of evil DRM? :(

Brad
2006-01-04, 21:17
Build a time machine?

At this point, the system is the very definition of FUBAR: fucked-up beyond all repair/recognition.

The media associations have their tendrils too deep in American politics. The only way for these trends to reverse is if there is a major shift in power, such as both the MPAA and RIAA collapsing completely. Short of that, we're all screwed.

The likelihood of that is about as good as an honest person getting elected president along with a whole House and Senate of honest bribe-refusing people.

faramirtook
2006-01-04, 21:35
On the topic of DRM:

If the Macintosh platform succumbs to the level that the *IAA wants, I'm out. As a devout member of the Church of Steve, I'll convert to Torvaldsism and build my own computer.

But seriously, do you think Macs will end up like PCs will be in terms of heavily DRM'd?

Or will DVD Jon come to the rescue?

Baylor8306
2006-01-04, 21:56
If all you are looking for is streaming music while at work, or trying to find out new music that you may like, then Pandora (http://www.pandora.com) is amazing. I found it a few days ago and I am completely addicted. It is totally free there are a few ads but you can just run it in a seperate Safari window, not a seperate tab though. You give it a song or artist that you like and it plays other music based on what other people have said as well computer analysis of the music itself. If you click the image of the CD you can choose to buy the album from Amazon or the track from iTunes. You can also tell it whether or not you like the song and it takes that into account when selecting music. Try it and be addicted!

Brad
2006-01-04, 21:58
On the topic of DRM:

If the Macintosh platform succumbs to the level that the *IAA wants, I'm out. As a devout member of the Church of Steve, I'll convert to Torvaldsism and build my own computer.

But seriously, do you think Macs will end up like PCs will be in terms of heavily DRM'd?

Or will DVD Jon come to the rescue?

Uh, too late, faramirtook. I take it you haven't noticed this little thing called the iTunes Music Store or QuickTime (versions 6 and 7)? :p DRM is here already and its presence will only increase alongside Windows PCs.

Apple has no choice but to comply. Either it agrees to the industry's demands or it'll get left behind as a substandard OS that will support a shrinking amount of media.

Linux is no place to escape either. The introduction of these technologies will leave open source initiatives in the dust as the encryption becomes harder to break. Don't forget (this is more directed to others reading the thread) that we have open-sourced DVD playback thanks not to legions of hackers but to the work of one brilliant man, the "DVD Jon" you mentioned, who also cracked the original FairPlay DRM. Country-hopping, law-breaking cryptography geniuses like Jon don't just appear every day, though, especially as other countries comply with the requests of the US government and US corporations and as they adopt DMCA-friendly laws.

faramirtook
2006-01-04, 22:53
Yeah, I know about the iTMS DRM. And I personally think that that DRM isn't so bad. It's rather tolerable.

Rootkits and foreign .kexts. on the other hand, are.

Franz Josef
2006-01-05, 12:43
Even attempting to circumvent these kings of protection is a federal crime in the US under the DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act).And sadly the European Union is implementing similar rules in each country ( eg here (http://www.videolan.org/eucd.html) ). I understand the guy who broke the Sony rootkit story was in breach of the DMCA. Happy times. :no:

WMD
2006-01-05, 15:46
Don't forget (this is more directed to others reading the thread) that we have open-sourced DVD playback thanks not to legions of hackers but to the work of one brilliant man, the "DVD Jon" you mentioned, who also cracked the original FairPlay DRM.
DVD Jon didn't break FairPlay; that was someone else. What DVD Jon did was create a cross-platform iTMS client that had no DRM support -and the store didn't notice. So you payed for the songs like normal but they were never encrypted (that happens client-side in iTunes).

Brad
2006-01-05, 16:05
No, that's something different that he did. Over two years ago, DVD Jon also "broke" the older FairPlay encryption scheme by developing a way (in an app called MyTunes) to process regular purchased files that would return an unencumbered, savable stream.

Mugge
2006-01-05, 16:33
And sadly the European Union is implementing similar rules in each country ( eg here (http://www.videolan.org/eucd.html) ). I understand the guy who broke the Sony rootkit story was in breach of the DMCA. Happy times. :no:

Speaking about the EU. I would seriously like to see the DRD (http://www.eu.int/rapid/pressReleasesAction.do?reference=MEMO/05/328&format=HTML&aged=0&language=EN&guiLanguage=en) dead. It's almost as f***ed up ad the DMCA! :mad: :no:

And I blame people for voting on sub-standard politicians. Grrr. Ok, I'll be quiet now, and go somewhere else and whine about this POS.