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Capella
2009-07-05, 10:55
So my dad warned me against getting the Arcade, but didn't explain exactly why. I was wondering why everyone thinks the Arcade sucks so much? I mean, how limiting is the 512 MB of memory?

I'm not planning on downloading Arcade games, so I'm not going to be filling up the memory card that way. I want Rock Band, Fable, Mass Effect, and Dragon Age. That's about it for my initial plans.

Is the Arcade still a bad idea given what I want to play? Why is the Pro version much better? What advantages does the hard drive have over the flash memory? Any advice would help.

evan
2009-07-05, 10:57
some games require the hard drive, not sure which though...

jdcfsu
2009-07-05, 11:31
If you want to play Rock Band, and plan on buying any additional songs, then the Arcade version is not the way to go. You can always buy a hard drive kit later should you need it, but it's probably cheeper to go with the Pro version now rather than waiting to upgrade later.

The other benefit is ripping the games to the hard drive. You still need the disk in to play, but it doesn't spin the disk other then the initial load, so the crazy loud xbox cd drive isn't an issue and then games load much, much faster. Each game takes about 4-6 GB of space and for some, it's well worth the space.

My view on any time of storage media, it's better to have space than not and wish you did.

Robo
2009-07-05, 12:08
@CoachKryzewski: The only Xbox 360 game that I am aware of that requires the hard drive is Final Fantasy XI Online. More games may require the hard drive in the future (any other MMORPGs almost certainly will). But jdcfsu is right in that many games allow you to "install" them on the hard drive, for faster load times (and to reduce noise).

The Xbox 360 Arcade isn't capable of HD graphics out of the box, as it includes only a composite video cable. The Xbox 360 ("Pro") includes a hybrid composite/component video cable, and the Xbox 360 Elite includes both the hybrid composite/component video cable and an HDMI cable. (All current Xbox 360 systems are capable of component video and HDMI - the lower-end ones just don't include the cable(s). Savvy?)

Also, are you planning on going online? No Xbox 360 system supports Wi-Fi out of the box - Microsoft wants you to buy their $99 adaptor :mad: - but the Xbox 360 ("Pro") and Xbox 360 Elite come with a headset and ethernet cable. The Arcade doesn't. Just a thought.

Really, it just comes down to what you're planning on doing with it. At $199, the Arcade isn't nearly as bad a deal as the Core/Arcade models used to be. Microsoft even makes a $99 kit that includes a 60GB hard drive, headset, ethernet cable, and Xbox Live trial - so even if you decide to buy that kit later, the only thing you're missing out on for your $300 is the component video cable.

It just comes down to what you're planning on doing with it. If you don't really see yourself going online and downloading new songs or anything, then it probably wouldn't hurt to go with the Arcade - even if you decide to get the 60GB kit later, you wouldn't be out too much compared to the Xbox 360 ("Pro"), just the cost of the component cable.

Hope that helps!

PKIDelirium
2009-07-05, 12:20
^Yeah, what he said. I'd actually suggest getting the Arcade and the $99 Live pack. Same price plus you get 3 months of Live. The Arcades are still the only way to guarantee getting the latest Jasper motherboard.

I have a Jasper Pro, but I had to search for quite a while checking labels and whatnot. Also now that the holiday 2008 bundles are gone, they're back to clearing out stock of the previous-gen Falcon Pro models.

Robo
2009-07-05, 12:29
^Yeah, what he said. I'd actually suggest getting the Arcade and the $99 Live pack. Same price plus you get 3 months of Live. The Arcades are still the only way to guarantee getting the latest Jasper motherboard.

True, but a store-brand component video cable would cost $20, anyway, so it'd work out to be the same. ;)

I don't mean to be talking about the component video cable so much, I swear! :lol: I just can't stand it when people hook up their HD boxes to their HDTV using non-HD cables. That's right up there with people insisting that a stretched widescreen picture "looks good" on the Roboman Twitch Scale.

Now, Capella might not have an HDTV, and that's okay, but component cables would still have better quality, provided her TV had the inputs. If she has an HDTV with HDMI, then she should skip the store and buy $6 cables at Monoprice and, as you suggest, buy the $199 Arcade and the $99 60GB kit (for the XBL trial).

Capella
2009-07-05, 12:38
I don't have an HDTV, so I'm intending to hook my machine up to my LCD widescreen monitor. As for downloading Rock Band songs, I might do that, but since I'm mostly getting sinpleplayer RPGS- and how did I leave Oblivion out- I'm not planning on doing any online play. So honestly the only DLC I would get would be for RB.

So, do I still need the HD for RB DLC? Or is the Arcade, and then later on the 60GB kit, a better idea?

jdcfsu
2009-07-05, 12:43
I don't have an HDTV, so I'm intending to hook my machine up to my LCD widescreen monitor. As for downloading Rock Band songs, I might do that, but since I'm mostly getting sinpleplayer RPGS- and how did I leave Oblivion out- I'm not planning on doing any online play. So honestly the only DLC I would get would be for RB.

So, do I still need the HD for RB DLC? Or is the Arcade, and then later on the 60GB kit, a better idea?

Don't forget Lost Odyssey, best RPG ever made.

I have about 2 GB of RB DLC, so it really depends on how much you plan to grab.

Robo
2009-07-05, 12:45
I think the expansions included in the Oblivion Game of the Year Edition require the hard drive to install. Maybe someone who has the Xbox 360 version could confirm?

Luca
2009-07-05, 18:03
Final Fantasy XI Online is for the PS2 and is the only PS2 game that uses the optional hard drive for that system (and that hard drive is only for the fat version, which isn't even sold anymore).

Having a hard drive is really nice. It lets you download DLC for games, arcade games, and game demos. It also is required for backwards compatibility. I'd actually recommend getting the Arcade and then looking for a good deal on a 20 GB hard drive module. You should be able to find it for around $30. Remember that you'll also have to supply your own cables if you don't want crappy composite video (a component cable is only $7 from Monoprice; you can also get 360-specific VGA or generic HDMI cables from the same place for similar prices). And you have to dig up a spare ethernet cable or buy one if you don't already have a spare. The Xbox 360 controller will accept ANY wired headset with a 2.5mm jack - it doesn't have to be Xbox branded.

All told, the "Pro" bundle simply includes several things you can add later yourself:

- Hard drive ($30 for a 20 GB unit, though the Pro ships with a 60 GB hard drive that costs a fair bit more than that by itself)
- Headset (I've seen generic 2.5mm wired headsets for $5 on the Target clearance rack)
- Ethernet cable ($5-$10 anywhere)
- Component video cables ($7 from Monoprice)

Also, the Arcade uses a matte white DVD drive tray rather than a chrome finish. I'd probably prefer the matte white myself. Oh, and the memory on the Arcade is now built-in, so if you want a memory card to move stuff around you'll have to buy one separately.

evan
2009-07-05, 19:22
backwards compatibility. That's what I was thinking of.

Robo
2009-07-05, 21:06
Final Fantasy XI Online is for the PS2 and is the only PS2 game that uses the optional hard drive for that system (and that hard drive is only for the fat version, which isn't even sold anymore).

Final Fantasy XI Online is also available for the PC (http://www.amazon.com/Final-Fantasy-Vanadiel-Collection-2008-Pc/dp/B00161I5IQ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=videogames&qid=1246845142&sr=8-1) and Xbox 360, (http://www.amazon.com/Final-Fantasy-Online-Collection-Xbox-360/dp/B000X2FTMY/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=videogames&qid=1246845142&sr=8-2) and all versions require a hard drive. And FFXI for the PS2 wasn't the only game that used the PS2 hard drive (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PS2_HDD#North_American_Releases_with_HDD_Support), it was simply the only US release that required it. :)

Luca
2009-07-05, 23:36
Final Fantasy XI Online is also available for the PC (http://www.amazon.com/Final-Fantasy-Vanadiel-Collection-2008-Pc/dp/B00161I5IQ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=videogames&qid=1246845142&sr=8-1) and Xbox 360, (http://www.amazon.com/Final-Fantasy-Online-Collection-Xbox-360/dp/B000X2FTMY/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=videogames&qid=1246845142&sr=8-2) and all versions require a hard drive. And FFXI for the PS2 wasn't the only game that used the PS2 hard drive (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PS2_HDD#North_American_Releases_with_HDD_Support), it was simply the only US release that required it. :)

Haha, nice job schooling me! :lol:

Anyway I'd say a hard drive is still worth it. Another nice thing is many FULL games have demos available for download. So if you're not sure if you want to buy a newly released game, you can just go on Xbox Live, download the demo, and see how you like it. Most of these are between 800 MB and 1.5 GB and won't fit on the 512 MB of internal memory.

Another thing: Rock Band DLC is around 30 MB per song. On 512 MB of internal memory, you'll only be able to get around 10 songs (once you account for other saved game data).

bassplayinMacFiend
2009-07-06, 06:48
Really, it just comes down to what you're planning on doing with it. At $199, the Arcade isn't nearly as bad a deal as the Core/Arcade models used to be. Microsoft even makes a $99 kit that includes a 60GB hard drive, headset, ethernet cable, and Xbox Live trial - so even if you decide to buy that kit later, the only thing you're missing out on for your $300 is the component video cable.

You also miss getting a wireless vs. wired controller. Of course, a wireless controller will necessitate a rechargeable battery purchase unless you want to find yourself needing to make a trip to the local 7-11 at 2AM because you're out of AA batteries (the controller eats non-rechargeable batteries like crazy).

Wyatt
2009-07-06, 07:20
You also miss getting a wireless vs. wired controller. Of course, a wireless controller will necessitate a rechargeable battery purchase unless you want to find yourself needing to make a trip to the local 7-11 at 2AM because you're out of AA batteries (the controller eats non-rechargeable batteries like crazy).
And then you have to hope your rechargeable battery lasts longer than mine did. I got a play & charge kit at Christmas last year, and the battery stopped charging at all in May. Now I have a wired controller with an entirely too short wire. :\

bassplayinMacFiend
2009-07-06, 08:10
And then you have to hope your rechargeable battery lasts longer than mine did. I got a play & charge kit at Christmas last year, and the battery stopped charging at all in May. Now I have a wired controller with an entirely too short wire. :\

Wow, that's weird. I have a battery I bought in December 2005 that's still going strong today.

jdcfsu
2009-07-06, 09:28
Wow, that's weird. I have a battery I bought in December 2005 that's still going strong today.

You're really lucky then. I've had similar results to Wyatt. Though I just bit the bullet and bought another Play and Charge kit. The wireless is to nice to sacrifice. Man, that was Johnny Cochran-esq!

Luca
2009-07-06, 09:36
You also miss getting a wireless vs. wired controller. Of course, a wireless controller will necessitate a rechargeable battery purchase unless you want to find yourself needing to make a trip to the local 7-11 at 2AM because you're out of AA batteries (the controller eats non-rechargeable batteries like crazy).

No, ever since MS changed the "Core" to the "Arcade" in October 2007, all 360s have shipped with a wireless controller.