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View Full Version : Refurb MBP arrived with 'damage' - should I send it back?


zippy
2010-02-09, 14:54
I guess I don't know what exactly to expect on refurbished items. I would have thought that any physical problems/blemishes would be repaired, but maybe this is why this unit was a refurb to begin with.

What do you all think?

http://gallery.me.com/kringsmd/100035/P1000007/web.jpg?ver=12657449710001

http://gallery.me.com/kringsmd/100035/P1000006/web.jpg?ver=12657449670001

curiousuburb
2010-02-09, 14:57
Pics no worky

zippy
2010-02-09, 15:11
?? They work as long as I'm logged into Mobile Me. I guess I need to set some viewing rights for unauthenticated users.


Edit. They should work now. I was doing it wrong.

/smack/ bad me!

PB PM
2010-02-09, 15:12
Having physical damage is a risk you take when you order a refurb.

Dave
2010-02-09, 15:16
I thought refurbs were supposed to be "like new".

julesstoop
2010-02-09, 15:24
What's that thin yellow thread?

zippy
2010-02-09, 15:26
I thought refurbs were supposed to be "like new".

That's kinda what I thought. It may only be cosmetic, but a hard enough jolt to cause damage like this could cause troubles down the road too.

zippy
2010-02-09, 15:27
What's that thin yellow thread?

I think you're seeing the edge of the plastic film that it is wrapped in -??

PB PM
2010-02-09, 15:39
I've heard many reports of damaged refurbs, so this is nothing new. I believe it even says in the refurb store that there are chances that your refurb could have minor cosmetic defects.

bassplayinMacFiend
2010-02-09, 15:47
Hmmm, both refurbs I've bought I couldn't tell the difference from a brand new unit. I would call Apple and see what they say.

zippy
2010-02-09, 15:47
I've heard many reports of damaged refurbs, so this is nothing new. I believe it even says in the refurb store that there are chances that your refurb could have minor cosmetic defects.

Nothing in here says anything about physical defects:
Apple Certified Refurbished Products

Frequently Asked Questions:

(1) What are Apple Certified Refurbished Products?

Apple Certified Refurbished Products are pre-owned Apple products that undergo Apple's stringent refurbishment process prior to being offered for sale. While only some units are returned due to technical issues, all units undergo Apple's stringent quality refurbishment process.

Each Apple Certified Refurbished Product:
is fully tested (including full burn-in testing).
is refurbished with replacement parts for any defective modules identified in testing.
is put through a thorough cleaning process and inspection.
is repackaged (including appropriate manuals, cables, new boxes, etc.).
includes the operating software originally shipped with the unit and the custom software offered with that system. See each products "Learn More" for more details.
is given a new refurbished part number and serial number.
is placed into a Final QA inspection prior to being added to sellable refurbished stock.
Refurbishment procedures follow the same basic technical guidelines as Apple's Finished Goods testing procedures.


(2) What should I expect when I purchase an Apple Certified Refurbished Product?
Substantial savings
A fully functional unit with complete documentation
The assurance that the unit meets Apple's premiere quality standards, and that its defective components have been replaced by genuine Apple components

(3) Can I purchase the AppleCare Protection Plan for my Apple Certified Refurbished Product?

All Apple Certified Refurbished Products are covered by Apple's One-Year Limited Warranty. For extended coverage, you have the option of purchasing the AppleCare Protection Plan with your Apple Certified Refurbished Product. The AppleCare Protection Plan extends the complimentary coverage on your Apple Certified Refurbished Product to up to three years of world-class support for Mac, and up to two years of world-class support for iPod, iPhone, and Apple TV.

And I could argue that broken or damaged physical parts should be covered under
is refurbished with replacement parts for any defective modules identified in testing

AndRefurbishment procedures follow the same basic technical guidelines as Apple's Finished Goods testing procedures would indicate that anything sold as refurb is 'as good as new' - which a dinged laptop is definitely not.

Banana
2010-02-09, 15:49
As for non-cosmetic damages, be aware they do tests on it to verify that it is in working condition and you still have a full warranty for a year.

I would be leery if it was on a craigslist or ebay but from Apple, not so much.

zippy
2010-02-09, 15:55
As for non-cosmetic damages, be aware they do tests on it to verify that it is in working condition and you still have a full warranty for a year.

I would be leery if it was on a craigslist or ebay but from Apple, not so much.

I guess I'm not worried about Apple standing behind the product - I have confidence that they will. But I also don't want the hassle of having to go through it if problems from this start to creep up later.

I know they test everything, but like I said, some problems take a bit longer to manifest themselves.

More than anything, I guess I could just be a bit bummed that I ordered what I thought was going to be a 'like new' product and got an 'almost like new' product.

PB PM
2010-02-09, 16:11
I'm not sure how a slightly deformed case could cause problems?

pscates2.0
2010-02-09, 16:22
I don't know either, exactly, but depending on where it is on the unit, maybe it is crimping or displacing a connector or some important moving part?

For the record, the seven Apple refurbs I've had experience with (two of my own, five to friends or relatives) were flawless in every single way. It's worth a phone call to Apple, IMO.

It's a free call, no matter what.

EDIT: What alcimedes says...at the very least, cover your butt and get it on record that your machine had a dent on the display portion on the day you received it. If that's in their logs/records from the get-go, it might help your case should something ever get flaky later on?

alcimedes
2010-02-09, 16:28
I would just worry that down the line, if there ever were a problem with the screen etc. they might say "look, you dropped or damaged the unit, there's a big dent right here" and then you're out of luck on the fix.

If nothing else, calling in and making a point of it might cover your butt down the line if anything fails that's screen related.

zippy
2010-02-09, 16:42
I'm not sure how a slightly deformed case could cause problems?

Because if it were dropped or banged with enough force to dent the frame, then there were shockwaves that traveled throughout the system. Other components could be jarred enough to be 'weakened' though not yet to a point of detectible failure. In the case of the screen - the case could be exerting force on the screen that could later cause lcd bleeding, or make the glass more susceptible to breakage.


Regardless, I just got off the phone with Apple Support. They said that the unit should not be dented, and offered a full refund without question. So I'll send this one back in and we'll have to decide whether to try the refurb route again, or see if the rumored updates pan out.

pscates2.0
2010-02-09, 16:45
Hell, yeah...that's what you want to hear. :)

I think they're pretty tight and strict on what goes out as refurbs. I've never seen a junky-looking refurb from Apple. Ever. Somehow that one squeaked through (or took a fall during shipping or final packaging).

Iago
2010-02-09, 16:48
If nothing else, calling in and making a point of it might cover your butt down the line if anything fails that's screen related.

Spot on. Although Apple store employees will be able to see that your machine was refurbished, the notes they have access to aren't comprehensive enough to preclude an eventuality where they deny you service you're entitled to because of cosmetic damage like this.

Simply calling to note that you just received the product and that it's dented is a really smart move.

Regardless, I just got off the phone with Apple Support. They said that the unit should not be dented, and offered a full refund without question.

This is what I was going to chip in with. Apple's refurb store offers units that were damaged or returned, but which are repaired. The casing of a MacBook Pro is a part just like a hard drive, and if this one is faulty then part of the process of it being refurbished is that it should be replaced.

zippy
2010-02-09, 16:50
Hell, yeah...that's what you want to hear. :)

I think they're pretty tight and strict on what goes out as refurbs. I've never seen a junky-looking refurb from Apple. Ever. Somehow that one squeaked through (or took a fall during shipping or final packaging).

I don't think it was during shipping. The box doesn't have any damage.

It's possible that it happened during packaging, after final inspection. If that were the case, then there may be other post inspection damage.

One of the Apple support techs I spoke to said something along the lines of "somebody messed up."

Robo
2010-02-09, 17:12
Oh, dear. I didn't see this thread. I guess I should take back what I said in the other thread, about you receiving a "proven machine." :lol:

But all is well that ends well, I suppose. New MBPs really do seem to be imminent (though of course not as refurbs), so you probably will have quite a decision to make. Again. :p

julesstoop
2010-02-09, 17:29
I think you're seeing the edge of the plastic film that it is wrapped in -??

Thanks, I'm suddenly able to interpret what I see.

zippy
2010-02-09, 17:41
Thanks, I'm suddenly able to interpret what I see.

Hey, that's a skill some people never learn.:D

zippy
2010-02-09, 17:42
Oh, dear. I didn't see this thread. I guess I should take back what I said in the other thread, about you receiving a "proven machine." :lol:

But all is well that ends well, I suppose. New MBPs really do seem to be imminent (though of course not as refurbs), so you probably will have quite a decision to make. Again. :p

I think the decision will be easy enough. It's going back into the waiting process that will be the hardest.