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Rod
2011-11-15, 09:41
I am close to buying an 11 inch air with 128 GB. Because there are no moving parts in the machine is the $250.00 Apple Care policy something that is still necessary? What would you do.

Thanks for any help.

Rod

Maciej
2011-11-15, 10:29
I always get Apple Care for notebooks. It's not an issue with moving parts but with the logic board. More commonly than not, in my experience, if anything goes wrong it's going to require a logic board replacement. I had a FW port go bad on my last MBP, had to get the whole logic board replaced.

turtle
2011-11-15, 12:25
I used to always get AppleCare but haven't lately even on my laptops. I do not have it on my MBP right now (and past eligibility date to buy it) because I don't feel the need to spend that money. Apple makes solid products and I can repair it if needed. Sure I'd wish I had it if my logic board fails...but it's that the draw to buy insurance like this?

alcimedes
2011-11-15, 15:28
I'd be torn. For a while recently apple had a really good policy about replacing logic boards for a relatively low, flat fee as long as it hadn't failed due to abuse. if that's still the case, I'd pass on applecare, since it doesn't cover accidental damage.

Kyros
2011-11-15, 23:08
Personally I have never gotten Applecare, even for my notebooks and it has never bitten me. That being said, I've only bought a computer new (rather than used) once, so I haven't had much of a choice. Assuming Apple makes money on its Applecare plans, it stands to reason that it is, on average, a bad buy for the consumer. However, the financial burden of a costly repair might affect you disproportionately more than the cost of Applecare. That's something you have to figure out for yourself. It's also important to note that common problems are often eventually be repaired for free out of warranty, like the graphics chip problems of older MacBook Pros. But then, it can be months until Apple admits that there's a real problem, so that might not be very comforting either.

If I were to buy an MBA now (or any computer), I wouldn't get Applecare personally. But you have to know that if you can't afford the cost of a new logic board, you might be without your computer for a while if it fails.

Rod
2011-11-19, 08:36
Thank you for your replies. Sorry to get back with you so late, my Dell has been in the shop.I most likely will go with the care. I am not real computer literate (I don't know what a logic board is) and it will give me some peace of mind.

Thank you.

JohnnyTheA
2011-11-19, 12:29
I would get it for any laptop. The keyboard could get dorked up like mine did (they replaced it even though I was at fault). As others have said, the Mainboard could go bad (had that prob too..)

If u r a student, you get a nice discount on AppleCare.. I only wish I still had it on my 4 year old mbp. The trackpad is going wacko...

Dorian Gray
2011-11-19, 15:04
I long maintained AppleCare was a waste of money, but finally succumbed to the lure of stree-free computing for three years when I bought my MacBook Pro in August 2009. Just over two years later, I unexpectedly sold the machine, without having touched the AppleCare. That's 250 euros down the drain, more or less (having AppleCare might have helped resale value a little).

Really not sure it's worth the money, even if you're a heavy computer user who will subject the computer to more than average use. JohnnyTheA's experience above is one of the problems: in buying AppleCare, you'll inevitably pay for Apple to fix problems that shouldn't have been fixed by the plan. This makes it expensive (e.g. 250 euros).

PB PM
2011-11-19, 21:35
I always get Applecare, helps the trade in value. Of course the dealer I buy from refunds the price of Applecare if you don't use it. No brainer.

alcimedes
2011-11-21, 09:43
I think AppleCare really helps the resale value, but I never plan on selling a machine in the first three years.

Dorian Gray
2011-11-21, 10:54
I think AppleCare really helps the resale value, but I never plan on selling a machine in the first three years.

Neither do I, alcimedes. :) My needs changed, though, and my old MacBook Pro sold for more than my brand new twice-as-fast Mac mini.

I'm sure AppleCare does help resale value, but clearly in this regard it's not worth anywhere near its purchase price.

I think AppleCare makes sense for some people in some circumstances, but as for me, I'd rather not subsidise JohnnyTheA's accidental damage anymore. :p

Eugene
2011-11-21, 13:29
People are willing to pay a lot more for a 1-year-old machine than a 2 or 3-year-old machine, so if I buy AppleCare, it would be like Dorian's situation where I am supplying insurance for someone else entirely. I've pretty much decided at this point to buy a new system every year so I can get maximum value when I sell it. As an example, I recently sold a previous generation MBA for $900.

Dorian Gray
2011-11-21, 14:04
I've pretty much decided at this point to buy a new system every year so I can get maximum value when I sell it. As an example, I recently sold a previous generation MBA for $900.
Ah, "the Jade plan", as it was known as on Ars Technica. :)

jcoley2
2011-12-17, 09:36
I always get Apple Care for notebooks. It's not an issue with moving parts but with the logic board. More commonly than not, in my experience, if anything goes wrong it's going to require a logic board replacement. I had a FW port go bad on my last MBP, had to get the whole logic board replaced.

+1

Although I have never own an MBA i have had two laptops needing logic board replacing. I think it is well worth the money.

billybobsky
2011-12-17, 11:27
Every Mac to one-year assurance and blast abutment for 90 canicule from the date of purchase. If the botheration occurs, you accept to pay per-incident base. Iphone3gs, however, three years from the date of your Mac acquirement continued account coverage.
This is some sort of robot-AI spammer. It cannot be human, the use of the word canicule, which I had to look up and is misused here, is a simple mistranslation of a word indicating time period.

chucker
2011-12-17, 12:31
Yep. Looks Markov chain-esque to me.

thegeriatric
2011-12-17, 18:42
When I bought my Mac mini recently, I did not take out AppleCare??

Reason. I got a 2 year warranty as standard.

Perks of purchasing in a country where a 2 year warranty is standard on all electrical items. :)

chucker
2011-12-17, 18:57
What country is that? If you're referring to EU directive 1999/44/EC, that's very different from (and far more limited than) company warranty.

thegeriatric
2011-12-17, 19:10
I am referring to (Ley 23/2003, de 10 de julio, de Garantias en la Venta de Bienes de Consumo) Which is a Spanish law. And yes I believe it is linked with the EU directive 1999/44/EC.

Still a 2 year warranty for free can't be bad. :)

chucker
2011-12-17, 19:52
Oh, it's definitely good consumer protection.

The purpose of that directive is to ensure that consumer electronics work properly for 24 months. Assuming it's roughly standardized between Spain and Germany, however, this isn't quite as great as it sounds. For the first six months, it's fine; after that, you, the consumer, have to prove that the defect was already there upon purchase (i.e., that it isn't your fault).

Maciej
2012-04-01, 09:55
Gah! I forgot to extend Apple Care before it expire about 3 weeks ago.

I always get Apple Care for notebooks.

Now I guess this isn't true anymore.

On the bright side, if anything does break I guess I'll have a fun decision of whether I wanna eat the cost or upgrade. :\

turtle
2012-04-01, 11:16
This happened to my AppleCare on my refurb MBP. I so meant to get it on this especially since it's a refurb.