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no, seriously though, what is used for in writing?


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no, seriously though, what is used for in writing?
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stevegong
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2004-07-19, 04:45

So what does it mean?

I did a search in Google and got 0 results.
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Moogs
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2004-07-19, 08:52

I think as a proofing mark it might have to do with reversing the position of two words or phrases within a sentence, but I'm not sure. I've only rarely seen it used and not recently at that.

...into the light of a dark black night.
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Brad
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2004-07-19, 08:55

My professors routinely write that up on a blackboard or overhead to signify chapter and section number -- like 10.1.

I somehow doubt that's the official "proper" usage of that symbol, though.

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Luca
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2004-07-19, 08:59

Yeah, I think the way my profs (in math/science courses) have used it is as an abbreviation for "Section," hence the S shape. However, a lot of my professors in those classes were not native English speakers, and a few can barely understand or speak it at all, so I doubt they're using it properly. I have never seen an instructor in a reading or writing course use the symbol.
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Brad
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2004-07-19, 09:03

Huh! Actually, that IS correct usage. Now that I think about it, I do believe I've seen the section symbol used throughout long technical and legal documents.

http://tlt.its.psu.edu/suggestions/i...s/codemac.html

http://www.law.sc.edu/handout.htm

Quote:
Examples:

30 U.S.C. 523 (1994).
S.C. Code Ann. 20-7-110 (1976).

...The section symbol () is used. One space between each element. No comma between the section or paragraph number and the year. If citing to more than one section, specify exactly which sections. Don't use et seq. (30 U.S.C. 523-528 (1994)).

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Luca
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2004-07-19, 09:38

Wow. All along, those Indian and Chinese professors, who could barely understand and respond to the questions asked by their students, somehow knew more about one aspect of the English language than I did!

Funny how I stumbled upon the correct answer like that. I had no idea what it meant either, at least what its "official" meaning was.
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alcimedes
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2004-07-19, 09:47

actually, i've found more often than not that people who aren't native english speakers have a much better grasp of the written language and its rules than native english speakers.
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Luca
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2004-07-19, 09:50

True, they're probably studying it just as intensely (if not moreso) as the subject they are teaching. I don't see a beginning English speaker using a symbol like that for some made-up purpose. Native speakers are much more sloppy .
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Moogs
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2004-07-19, 09:58

Huh. Maybe I saw that in one of my papers in college, and the prof was actually referring me to some other section of the paper. Derrrr! The transpose mark I was thinking of is the "S" turned on its side, and there's also a delete mark (there are several delete marks actually) that look similar to the Section thingy. Depending on how badly the prof scribbles his marks of course.


...into the light of a dark black night.
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stevegong
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2004-07-19, 10:01

Quote:
Originally Posted by alcimedes
actually, i've found more often than not that people who aren't native english speakers have a much better grasp of the written language and its rules than native english speakers.

Well, not trying to be smart or anything but I've noticed that a lot of the students at my University have a pretty bad grasp of English.

They write essays in a very colloquial way and they often stumble on elementary grammar.

A lot of people seem to be confused about the usage of its and it's, and their there and they're.

I wonder why they still don't know it by Uni.
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dviant
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2004-07-19, 10:08

Hey thats funny. I was JUST looking up info on this character last night.. didn't find much. I knew that it's a Section Symbol but couldn't really find any kind of "proper" usage guidelines for it. Nifty!

Shhhh, I can't see!
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Barto
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2004-07-19, 10:08

If you learn English informally, you use it informally. While sometimes usage is just wrong (its and it's, their there they're), sometimes it is just an author's style which is only objected to by uppity Latinglish academics who think everyone should speak like monks in the middle ages.

Yeah literacy is bad in English-speaking countries. Proper english is just not wanted frankly and having been raised in that culture I can't see objectively how good or bad of a thing that is. Growing up in a culturally German region (90% or so descendants of 19th century German Lutheran immigrants), the English I grew up with was an interesting flavour of English to say the least.

Barto

The sky was deep black; Jesus still loved me. I started down the alley, wailing in a ragged bass.

Last edited by Barto : 2004-07-19 at 10:16.
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stevegong
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2004-07-19, 10:19

Well, the thing I particularly can't stand is using slang in a formal essay as if it were perfectly ok.

There was this girl.....

ugh...


Besides, I learned English somewhat informally too, and often make some mistakes in style. Most people won't even think they're wrong, but it's just not correct usage in proper English.

ugh, I need an English textbook.
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Moogs
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2004-07-19, 10:51

Are you kidding me? We have a whole generation of students growing up in America today who are *encouraged* to use slang and any other forms of "self-expression" in their writings. The theory goes, that they do so little writing and reading, that anything is a better alternative, even writing with slang and improper usage. Witness the "Ebonics taught in schools" debate that raged in Oakland and other places a few years ago.

We are now a nation that favors self-expression over learning languages, and making an effort over learning facts and formulas. You get an A+ for "2+2=7" as long as you really tried hard and know that 2 and 7 are numbers and not letters.

...into the light of a dark black night.
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staph
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2004-07-19, 19:56

Quote:
Originally Posted by Barto
If you learn English informally, you use it informally. While sometimes usage is just wrong (its and it's, their there they're), sometimes it is just an author's style which is only objected to by uppity Latinglish academics who think everyone should speak like monks in the middle ages.

Barto
Them's fighting words, boyo!
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Barto
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2004-07-20, 00:34

I'd pretend I'd back them up with action if I did not know you are probably within 3 minutes walk from me
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