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Official Space Exploration Coolness Thread
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Moogs
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2012-10-14, 13:12

Visor fogging up. Crap.
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Moogs
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2012-10-14, 13:12

Chute's out. No idea what his altitude was... lol
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Yontsey
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2012-10-14, 13:17

That was fucking nuts.
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Moogs
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2012-10-14, 13:17

Perfect landing right on his feet. Congratulations Alex!
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Moogs
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2012-10-15, 18:01

All right so I might be partly doofus too. Apparently the checklist guy was Kittinger, the former record holder. But I stand by my comments that he didn't seem particularly regimented or serious about it, even fumbling over his own words and issuing the wrong description at one point / being corrected.

One possible explanation that is surprising: Baumgartner suffers from panic attacks in these space suits Chalk up the "extra cahones points" on that one for going ahead with it anyway. As if he required any after yesterday's awesomeness.

Quote:
Although he had no trouble jumping off buildings and bridges, and soaring across the English Channel in a carbon-fiber wing, he found himself suffering panic attacks when forced to spend hours inside the pressurized suit and helmet. At one point in 2010, rather than take an endurance test in it, he went to an airport and fled the United States. With the help of a sports psychologist and other specialists, he learned techniques for dealing with the claustrophobia.

One of the techniques Mr. Baumgartner developed was to stay busy throughout the ascent. He conversed steadily with Mr. Kittinger, a former fighter pilot whose deep voice exuded the right stuff as he confidently went through a 40-item checklist rehearsing every move that Mr. Baumgartner would make when it came time to leave the capsule.
I don't know though; I'm used to this guy's approach to mission control:



I guess there can be only one.

...into the light of a dark black night.
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Chinney
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Ottawa, ON
 
2012-10-15, 21:35

The video images of Baumgartner sliding out of the capsule and perched on the edge, and then launching himself downwards were absolutely incredible: some of the most compelling that I can remember. The sense of vulnerability was overwhelming. I just can't get it out of my mind.

When there's an eel in the lake that's as long as a snake that's a moray.
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turtle
Lord of the Rant.
Formerly turtle2472
 
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2012-10-15, 22:57

Little did anyone know, there was a stowaway on that capsule!
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Moogs
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2012-10-16, 10:06

It was only a matter of time until ceiling cat appeared. Ceiling cat has no chute. Ceiling cat needs no chute.



And now back to your regularly scheduled space exploration:

Hubble Extreme Deep Field in the house.


This exposure lasted nearly 23 days over the course of 10 years!

...into the light of a dark black night.
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Moogs
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2012-10-16, 17:14

Here's another physics type question:

So... we look at galaxies like this. We estimate the "original distance" of one of them to be -- let's pick a number -- 50 million light years away. So the light left that place 50 million years ago and got here yesterday.

However the distance of the galaxy today is something very different (potentially), right? It could be the same distance, but only if traveling the same direction and at speed as our galaxy. Or it could be much further (if traveling the opposite direction or otherwise divergent path). It could also be closer if on the same path and traveling at a higher speed. Headscratcher: is the only way galaxies collide by one overtaking the other, as opposed to crossing one another's paths?

Anyway, during the intervening 50 million years, that galaxy has been zooming (towards, away from, etc) our viewpoint, at whatever speed it has, right? Let's say the galaxy moves 1000 miles per second and assume it's not accelerated appreciably in that time frame (even though the universe is both expanding in all directions and accelerating now).

So now the actual position of that galaxy could be 1000 miles * (50,000,000 years * 31536000 seconds per year not counting leap years) farther away from us if traveling in the opposite direction... or some lesser distance closer, right (based on closing speed)?

...into the light of a dark black night.
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PKIDelirium
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Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Xenia, Ohio
 
2012-10-31, 16:46

Damnit Intrepid...

http://www.collectspace.com/news/news-103012a.html
http://instagram.com/p/RaBr0THoKw/
http://d.pr/i/xgb8
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thegelding
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2012-11-01, 22:40



the full sized image is amazing...such great quality photos from another freaking planet...

Gavin
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Quagmire
meh
 
Join Date: May 2004
 
2012-11-01, 22:50

Minor damage?!?! Her vertical stabilizer is missing a decent chunk off the top! This adds insult to injury with the wingtip being damaged as well..... I'm starting to think Enterprise should have gone to Houston....

giggity
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Moogs
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2012-11-29, 09:57

Uber-massive Black Hole discovered in small galaxy. Black hole is 4000x larger than the one at center of Milky Way, but the galaxy is only 25% as large as Milky Way. Although I don't know how much fudge-factor there are in numbers like that.



May cause cosmological rethink?

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-20528137

...into the light of a dark black night.
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Quagmire
meh
 
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2012-12-01, 23:13

The black hole is probably eating up the galaxy....
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curiousuburb
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2012-12-02, 09:01

Further Up Yonder

Earth from ISS time lapse awesomeness
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Moogs
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2012-12-02, 15:05

Quote:
Originally Posted by Quagmire View Post
The black hole is probably eating up the galaxy....
I thought the size of the black hole had more to do with the size of the star that collapsed than how much stuff it "eats" or how long it's been "feeding"? In fact it always stays the same size once it's born, doesn't it? In theory?

...into the light of a dark black night.
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Quagmire
meh
 
Join Date: May 2004
 
2012-12-02, 16:21

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moogs View Post
I thought the size of the black hole had more to do with the size of the star that collapsed than how much stuff it "eats" or how long it's been "feeding"? In fact it always stays the same size once it's born, doesn't it? In theory?
Sorry, I was referencing that it is a smaller galaxy than the milky way, but has a significantly bigger black hole.
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Dave
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2012-12-02, 17:53

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moogs View Post
I thought the size of the black hole had more to do with the size of the star that collapsed than how much stuff it "eats" or how long it's been "feeding"? In fact it always stays the same size once it's born, doesn't it? In theory?
No
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Moogs
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2012-12-02, 23:46

I thought at a certain point you get the "jets" coming out of either pole, and that it's sort of an input/output situation (matter neither created nor destroyed) but that the black hole pretty much stays the same unless it merges with another back hole.

...into the light of a dark black night.
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Moogs
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2012-12-03, 10:55

This is maybe the coolest cosmological photograph I've seen, so thought I'd post it. It's a hybrid image with infrared from Spitzer, X-Ray from Chandra, and visible light from a telescope in Chile. If you want desktop sizes go here.


...into the light of a dark black night.
  quote
Moogs
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2012-12-03, 21:59

Meanwhile... in a further notice to humanity that we know even less about space and space travel than we think we do... it's come to the attention of scientists we didn't even accurately predict the conditions at the boundary of our solar system, let alone interstellar space. We have a long way to go before thinking about deep space travel / colonization. Mars we could hack with our growing knowledge of same and success getting there... maybe.

http://arstechnica.com/science/2012/...-solar-system/

...into the light of a dark black night.
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Quagmire
meh
 
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2012-12-04, 15:16

I wonder what Santa left under Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex's christmas tree.....

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Moogs
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2012-12-04, 17:33

Somewhere out there, Neil DeGrasse Tyson is weeping.
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Quagmire
meh
 
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2012-12-04, 21:27

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moogs View Post
Somewhere out there, Neil DeGrasse Tyson is weeping.
Because santa didn't give him a space shuttle for christmas?
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Moogs
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2012-12-05, 14:15

Haha.

You know damn well because why.
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turtle
Lord of the Rant.
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2012-12-05, 22:12

This was a great tour. It answered a lot of questions I had. ISS tour anyone?
http://www.wimp.com/orbitaltour/
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Quagmire
meh
 
Join Date: May 2004
 
2012-12-31, 15:21

How would personal on the launch pad get to safety if a fueled up Saturn V decided to go boom?

They would go here
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Moogs
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2012-12-31, 16:13

It's a cool idea / set of pictures but one doubts there would be anything near the amount of time necessary for:

a) someone to realize there is an impending disaster not able to be averted
b) have enough time to warn people and
c) the personnel having enough time to get out of the capsule, down the elevator, down the chute, etc.

OTOH if they thought a bomb was going to drop on Cape Canaveral and had a few minutes, this is a great idea.

...into the light of a dark black night.
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Quagmire
meh
 
Join Date: May 2004
 
2012-12-31, 17:06

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moogs View Post
It's a cool idea / set of pictures but one doubts there would be anything near the amount of time necessary for:

a) someone to realize there is an impending disaster not able to be averted
b) have enough time to warn people and
c) the personnel having enough time to get out of the capsule, down the elevator, down the chute, etc.

OTOH if they thought a bomb was going to drop on Cape Canaveral and had a few minutes, this is a great idea.
I don't think this was setup when the vehicle is about to be lit off. But when the Saturn V is being/finished fueled up, there is some kind of spark close to the umbilical cords that fuel the Saturn V that sets kerosene, etc on fire. There would be some time before the fire eats away at the metal and get itself into the tanks to set the Saturn V off, but I doubt enough time for personal to get into their vehicles and get 3 miles away from the pad. Also not aware of any heavy duty fire suppression system setup near these fueling lines that could suppress the fire.

giggity
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Moogs
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2012-12-31, 17:39

Interesting... how long were the astronauts on the pad prior to launch typically?
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