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What is it with Apples
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Jules26
 
 
2004-11-09, 09:33

O.K. I'm doing some research for a marketing project on Apple users and their love of and devotion to everything Apple. So spare a few minutes- tell me what it is about Apple that's so special- enlighten me!!
 
Barto
Student extraordinaire
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Canberra, Australia
 
2004-11-09, 09:56

Messiahtosh, there's someone who wants to talk to you!
 
MCQ
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Join Date: May 2004
Location: NY
Send a message via MSN to MCQ  
2004-11-09, 10:17

^

I'd contribute, but I have to go to classes now.
 
UnixMac
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Phoenix, AZ
 
2004-11-09, 11:04

for one.. have you looked at the stock price lately?

Compare it with Gateway or Dell?

Sure Mac is only 3-5% of computer market, but Apple is 100% of Mac production which means they make as many computers as most large computer makers like HP, Gateway, IBM or Sony... only Dell makes more units. Additionally, even though Apple product exhibit a significantly higher degree of production and materials quality, their profit margin is still highest in the industry. This is due to their basically monopolistic pricing power.

Apple's iPod and iTunes also is the 800lb Guerilla in the music download business. Everyone else is following...

QuickTime Mpeg4 is the industry standard for DV editors, Apple owns it.

Also, OS X is now the single biggest distribution of Unix. Unix IS the best, most robust professional grade OS available. Unix compared to Windows XP Pro is like Basic compared to Forth in the computer language world.

I'm sure I'm forgetting a dozen other items, but you can find out a lot more at www.apple.com/pro and www.apple.com/hotnews

good luck, and maybe you'll figure out that that PC you're using is not worth the plastic and silicone it's made of in the process...
 
bassplayinMacFiend
Banging the Bottom End
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
 
2004-11-09, 12:06

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jules26
O.K. I'm doing some research for a marketing project on Apple users and their love of and devotion to everything Apple. So spare a few minutes- tell me what it is about Apple that's so special- enlighten me!!
No one can be told what Apple is, you have to experience it for yourself.

For me, it's all the little things that show how much the hardware & software engineers care about their products.

Take Expose for example. (If you don't know what Expose is, check out http://www.apple.com/macosx/features/expose/ ). If I just press F9, the action occurs. When I press F9 again, the desktop goes back to the way it was. BUT, if I press & HOLD F9, everything moves out of the way like before, but as soon as I stop pressing the F9 button the desktop goes back to the way it was originally. Same for the F10 & F11 functions.

Another example is Apple's wired network ports. I can connect my Apple to another computer with a regular network cable. My Apple will detect that no hub is present and will also function as hub so I don't have to buy a special 'crossover' cable to directly connect 2 machines. I have a switch/router at home so I don't have to worry about this kind of thing at home but it certainly made life easier in school. Before those USB static RAM things came out anyway. Still, this is another case of Apple engineers trying to make their computers braindead simple to operate.

I like being able to change parameters (network address, workgourp/domain) WITHOUT HAVING TO REBOOT. I have yet to reboot for anything other than OS updates.

Things are simpler on a Mac. For example, at the school I just graduated from, the whole campus is covered by a wireless network. The instructions for a Windows user is 7 printed pages long (with screenshots). For OS X, their is only 1 printed page, because the OS does the work for me. All I have to do is turn on my wireless card and log in.

Some of the differences were immediately obvious the lack of rebooting for every little thing for example. Other revelations took longer to coalesce into being. About 3 or 4 months of owning my first Apple I "got" it.

Put succinctly, Apple computers get out of your way and let you do your work with as little hassle as possible.
 
pscates2.0
Mr. Farmiga
 
Join Date: May 2004
 
2004-11-09, 12:11

I think Messiahtosh is purposely avoiding this thread...

He should've been here by now, with 20-25 paragraphs (and somehow work in some name-calling and veiled insults along the way).

 
aelix
New Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
 
2004-11-09, 15:12

Here is a review of a Mac product that gives good insight: Delicious Library.

It goes in depth into what differentiates a Mac application from any other OS, the thought processes involved, etc.

However, I think if you boil the entire thing down to one word, its quite easy: Quality.
 
julesstoop
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Leiden, the Netherlands
 
2004-11-09, 16:03

The Apple-logo is hypnotizing. Once you have bought any of Apple's products, you'll be exposed to it for long enough to get you addicted.
 
UnixMac
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Phoenix, AZ
 
2004-11-09, 16:39

Or think of it like this...

Mac = BMW 745
PC = Chevy Lumina

Really.
 
kscherer
The Ban Hammer
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Boyzeee
 
2004-11-09, 17:02

Uh-oh! Car analogies! Here we go, again!

Really, this thread is kind of unnecessary. Jules, perhaps you should just read through the umpteen bazillion posts in AN. I bet you could find what you're looking for sans a new thread.

I wonder if Messiah is still writing his reply!

Boise State! … Boise State! … Boise State!
 
JayReding
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Minneapolis, MN
 
2004-11-09, 17:15

I'm a recent switcher.

The reason I switched over is because Macs *just work*. I'd been fighting with my Compaq laptop trying to get it to see my shared drive on my desktop. WinXP Home and WinXP Pro don't talk to each other very well at all.

Within 10 minutes of getting my Mac out of the box, it had already connected to the shared drive and was transferring files. It was painless.

Ditto with iTunes. I sync my iPod to my desktop, but when I want to listen to music iTunes lets me wirelessly stream from my desktop to any machine in my house, Mac or PC. It just works.

OS X is the best operating system ever written. I first used a Mac for work in 2001. By 2003 and OS X 10.3, the Mac OS had gotten appreciably faster with every upgrade. The old 400mHz Mac I used back then was as zippy as the 1.2gHz PCs we also used. I could run Photoshop, Dreamweaver, Safari, a text editor, and iTunes, and still not have the system feel like it was bogged down.

And in the unlikely event of an app crash - all I did is pop over to the Terminal, and in two easy commands I could kill the process without harming the system.

And the visuals - OS X is a very good looking OS, and that eye candy isn't graituitous. Once you try Expose, you never want to go back.

Once you try one, you'll understand...
 
BarracksSi
BANNED
I am worthless beyond hope.
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Washington, DC
 
2004-11-09, 18:14

So many words in these posts!...

It goes like this:

1) Use a Mac.
2) "What, that's it? It's that easy?? Why can't all computers be like this?"

Really, that sums up the bulk of it. Everybody else here has explained the details pretty well.
 
autodata
hustlin
 
Join Date: May 2004
 
2004-11-09, 18:20

1. The media software is the best (FCP, Logic, etc)

2. Unix-like, which means a FAR more comfortable environment for every kind of programming or scripting. Moving between the GUI and shell is also pretty seamless.

3. Don't have to think too much about what software to use for what task since a) apple software tends to work extremely well and b) 3rd party tends to be only a few competitors for each type of software and at least one is almost always extremely good.

4. Don't have to constantly worry about security.

5. The OS is built in a very logical way compared to windows, so when something goes wrong or you need to do something new it's very easy to figure out.

6. Don't have to spend time researching what computer to buy for my primary machine when I need a new one since I only get powerbooks.

Last edited by autodata : 2004-11-09 at 18:35.
 
autodata
hustlin
 
Join Date: May 2004
 
2004-11-09, 18:29

Also, if you are talking about understanding why people like or dislike a product or service, you should really use it yourself. I understand this is a school project, but in my workplace one of the most annoying things is the constant stream of misjudgements made by people that don't bother to learn about something through actual experience with it.
 
curiousuburb
Antimatter Man
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: that interweb thing
 
2004-11-09, 19:08

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Jobs
as quoted in Business Week, Oct 2004

I get asked a lot why Apple's customers are so loyal. It's not because they belong to the Church of Mac! That's ridiculous.

It's because when you buy our products, and three months later you get stuck on something, you quickly figure out [how to get past it]. And you think, "Wow, someone over there at Apple actually thought of this!" And then three months later you try to do something you hadn't tried before, and it works, and you think "Hey, they thought of that, too." And then six months later it happens again. There's almost no product in the world that you have that experience with, but you have it with a Mac. And you have it with an iPod.
Original here
 
autodata
hustlin
 
Join Date: May 2004
 
2004-11-09, 19:31

What jobs said ^^
 
Messiahtosh
Apple Historian
 
Join Date: May 2004
 
2004-11-09, 20:19

It's a commodity business, and Macs are not more of the same. They truly are different, unique, and the attention to detail from software to the look and feel of anything that Apple makes is special.

Plus, Steve Jobs is cool.

"We are reviewing some 9,000 recent UNHCR referrals from Syria. We are receiving roughly a thousand new ones each month, and we expect admissions from Syria to surge in 2015 and beyond." - Anne C. Richard, Assistant Secretary, Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration
 
UnixMac
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Phoenix, AZ
 
2004-11-09, 20:52

Quote:
Originally Posted by Messiahtosh
It's a commodity business, and Macs are not more of the same. They truly are different, unique, and the attention to detail from software to the look and feel of anything that Apple makes is special.

Plus, Steve Jobs is cool.
What? all this hype and talk about Messiahtosh writing a book and you give us a lousy two lines?? Speech! Speech! Speech!
 
Messiahtosh
Apple Historian
 
Join Date: May 2004
 
2004-11-09, 20:58

Bait? Fine...And I've started to write...
 
UnixMac
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Phoenix, AZ
 
2004-11-09, 20:59

looking forward to it.. (really).
 
pscates2.0
Mr. Farmiga
 
Join Date: May 2004
 
2004-11-09, 21:14



You shouldn't.



[ducks]

Kidding, Chris. I kid because I love...
 
Messiahtosh
Apple Historian
 
Join Date: May 2004
 
2004-11-09, 21:16

I wrote this a long time ago.

Steve Jobs has been labeled a visionary by many, and rightfully so. Though he may not be the tech celebrity that he once was, the charismatic, passionately counterculture chief executive officer of Apple Computer was once the most important individual in Silicon Valley. No longer is his name so strongly associated with the basic commonplace components of software and hardware design that he helped to pioneer and that computer users the world over, take for granted. Even today, he dictates the trends and, some would say, overall health of the industry, continuing to drive innovation.

Steven Paul Jobs was born on February 24, 1955 in Los Altos, California. According to several sources regarding Steve Jobs childhood, he was adopted from infancy by a Northern Californian machinist named Paul Jobs and an accountant, Clara Jobs, who are both now deceased. Being mostly a typical boy, Steve did well in school with no significant disciplinary problems. He was a person that was not easy to get to know, guarding himself carefully, which is something he still does today. His girlfriend from Homestead High School in Cupertino California remembered him saying, Someday I will be a millionaire, in a completely serious manner. Steve would talk about the future a lot and was usually involved in some form of a crusade over one thing or another.

Steves obsessive personality meshed quite well with his best friend Steve Wozniak, whom he called Woz. Steve Wozniak was a brilliant engineer and is responsible for some of the amazingly complex circuitry designs for computers. Woz was a prankster and a happy go lucky guy where as Steve Jobs was a motivator and usually serious. The two Steves were great friends since high school and still are friends today. After a brief one-semester stay at Reed College in Oregon, Steve Jobs sold his VW Bus and used the money saved from working at Atari (a computer game company) to travel to India. Steve went to India in search of spiritual enlightenment and guidance. He trekked around India with a shaven head and returned to California where he worked in the apple orchards on a Communal farm. After the short time spent working on the farm, he found that his friend Woz was working at Hewlett-Packard and building computers to impress pals at the Homebrew Computer Club. Wozniak was regarded as an engineering genius and soon Jobs realized the brilliance that Woz possessed. Jobs began attending Homebrew meetings with Woz. As a result, they both made names for themselves among hobbyists. At Homebrew, hobbyists from around the area would bring in their latest inventions, trying to outdo each other, all in good fun. But Wozniak had created a computer that Jobs saw as more than just fun: he thought this latest invention would attract a far wider audience than hobbyists. Jobs persuaded his friend into launching a business together.

Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak started Apple Computer in Jobs garage on April Fools day in 1976. The name Apple Computer comes from the pleasant summer job Steve had while working in an apple orchard. Little did Wozniak know that this company was not going to be a joke. Steve Jobs was totally convinced that the future of computers was for home users and education, something that seemed completely unreasonable to industry executives at that time. Mike Markkula, a former Intel board member, was looking for a venture opportunity when he heard about Steve Jobs. After meeting Steve, he was convinced Apple would be a winner. Mike took the Mom and Pop operation that Apple was and invested $250,000 into the upstart company. Having the luxury of starting in obscurity and brainstorming with Steve Wozniak, as the legend goes, Jobs built the Apple I in his parents garage. During the early 1970s, this was the most affordable personal computer of its time. In truth, it wasnt much more than an assembly-required toolkit consisting of a motherboard, crucial components, and a small frame. But its cheaper-than-hell $666 price tag put it in the hands of masses. Later, the duo would go on to craft the Apple II, and its many variations which marked the first true buying explosion in computer history. The Apple 1 Personal Computer was a success at the time, selling 33 units (a large sale at the time) to a local dealer. Wozniak and Jobs expanded upon the original design of the Apple 1 as they worked feverishly on the follow up, the Apple II. The Apple II was released in 1977 and was the first mass marketed personal computer. It had a plastic case and included color graphics. This is where Steve Jobs genius lies: in his ability to market a product. He has an amazing business sense about how the populous will perceive a product. By building the first personal computer that appealed to both businesses and home users, Apple quickly became a $335 million company. When the company went public in 1980 for $22 per share, the market value of Apple rose to 1.2 billion dollars. Steve Jobs became an overnight millionaire and in the process, a generational icon.

Meanwhile, Jobs was leading a development team that would change the face of personal computing forever. In December of 1979, Steve and his engineering team visited the elite Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC). Inside PARC, they saw the Alto Computer, a prototype that featured a graphical user interface (GUI) and an input device called the Mouse. Xerox executives saw no use for such technologies and thus let Apple use any knowledge gained from the PARC in their own business. Steve Jobs left the PARC with a look of amazement. He knew the future of personal computing was in the GUI. Steve and his team rushed back to Apple to implement these technologies (more than a billion dollar head start over competitors) into their latest computers.

In 1984, Jobs and a dedicated team at Apple created the Macintosh. During a time when most computer users displayed a single, raw, fluorescent font of text, the Mac was something remarkably new with its graphic user interfacean intuitive first in computer interactionrepresenting files and folders with friendly icons and windows, and its use of the 3.5 Floppy (it was the first computer to adopt the format, which would later be standardized so strongly that it is still being used today). The Mac opened the door to entirely new applications, involving graphics and then-breathtaking WYSIWYG text, which allowed users to see what their papers would look like on printed paper using PostScript fonts. There would be nothing even remotely close to it on IBM compatibles for years to come. The Macintosh was born. Sold with a mouse and a point-and-click graphics interface, the Macintosh radically changed the way people thought of computers. The advent of the GUI was practically like finding a use for the wheel. The interface brought ease of use to a whole new level, causing a paradigm shift in the use of technology. Any ordinary person was capable of using a computer after the Macintoshs release. Apple ran an advertisement during the 1984 Super Bowl, which has become one of the most famous in history. Featuring an Orwellian set, the ad showed a woman in red, representing Apple, destroying a dictator-like figure on a giant screen by throwing a large sledgehammer into the talking propagandizing face. The message was that 1984 would not be like the book 1984 in that there would be power given to the people by a new means of communication. The first major computing revolution was underway. The Macintosh was the computer that single handedly stole the industry from IBM and Microsoft, brining droves of customers to Apple. The war for market share was on and Apple was winning it. It would be 10 more years until the goliaths of IBM and Microsoft would retake the lead.

As amazing as the Macintosh was, the original sales predictions were not met and Apples board took issue with Steve Jobs over the problem. Steve Jobs had previously lured Pepsi President John Sculley to become the President of Apple. John Sculley brought a sense of reassurance to Wall Street. John was a proven businessman and was friends with Jobs for a few years in the early 80s, sharing his insights and knowledge about the industry. Sculley was secretly using Jobs, stealing his ingenious ideas and making personal use of them. Tension was building because soon Jobs realized what was happening. It was too late though, and Jobs had lost control of his very own company. In a famous coup attempt, Jobs attempted to take the power struggle to a vote by the Apple board members. Jobs said, If you want innovation, you should vote for me. If you want a business man, you should vote for John. The board voted Jobs out by a slim margin. Crushed, Jobs resigned from the company in late 1985. Steve sold his Apple stock worth an estimated 100 plus million dollars and started a new company.

Steve was now on the outside of his true passion, Apple Computer. Steve loved everything he did at Apple and was now watching from outside as its once prominent place in the industry was diminishing. He started his own computer company, NeXT Computer, hoping to reinvent the success of Apple. NeXT made some incredibly advanced hardware and software. The NeXTStep operating system was the most advanced of the time but ran on hardware called the NeXT Cube (a stunning 10 solid black cube-shaped computer) that cost from 6,000 to 10,000 dollars. The price of this technology was too much for an ordinary person to afford. The commercially unsuccessful NeXT computers in many ways emulated the wealth of innovation delivered by the original Macintosh, this time on the multimedia front. The sleek, austere magnesium cubes (which themselves were considered revolutions in computer aesthetics) housed circuitry that could pump out full stereo sound and play full motion videoboth industry firsts. NeXTs programming interfaces and operating system software were, and still are, considered such breakthroughs in developmental ease of use that programmers are using the API (an Applications Programming Interface called, NEXTSTEP) to create applications for the Macintosh Operating System version Ten (Mac OS X).

NeXT burned through hundred of millions of dollars with a terrible return on investment. NeXT became the laughing stock of Silicone Valley. The media that had once adored Steve now spurned him. For the first time in his life, Steve had produced a business failure, but at the same time it was a technological success.

Steve wasnt completely down though because the other venture of his was a success. Jobs had bought Pixar Animation Studios from George Lucas in 1986 for a mere $10 million. The animation house was a success from the start, creating the first ever wholly computer-generated film was called Luxo Jr. Luxo Jr. was a cartoon about a desk lamp getting into mischief until its father lamp comes along and scolds it for jumping on and popping a ball. Pixars animation continues to be state of the art and stunningly creative under the brilliant direction of John Lassetar. Lassetar created movies such as Toy Story, Toy Story 2, A Bugs Life, and Monsters Inc. Steve Jobs, to this day, is the CEO of Pixar, the Academy Award winning film studio.

During this time in the mid to late 80s, Steve started a family. He met his wife Laurene when giving a speech at Stanford University. He was speaking to an audience when he saw her in the crowd. He approached her after the keynote and they soon became friends, eventually marrying.

Steve Jobs had a friend in Silicone Valley named Larry Elisson, the CEO of Software giant Oracle. Larry and Steve had talked about paying billions of dollars to try and pull out a hostile take over of Apple. Larry publicly stated that the only person that could ever run and save Apple was Steve Jobs. At the time, the CEO of Apple was Gil Amelio, an uncharismatic but smart tech leader. He wasnt the brash visionary that Jobs had been. Apple was in need of a change. They were, ironically, looking for a next generation operating system for its Macintosh computers. Steves NextStep operating system was one of the choices that Apple was looking at as a possibility to buy. It seemed a far-fetched idea that Apple would pay money for a product that failed and for a manager that they fired nearly a decade ago. During Steves long exile, Apple had lost all of the qualities that had made it such an astonishing success during its early glory days. Apples software had once stood out as innovative, original, and uncommonly easy to use, but it hadnt changed that much in a decade. However, Steve was coming back to Apple.

In 1997, through an odd coincidence, Jobs was summoned to Apple as an interim CEO. The company had suffered terrible losses due to corporate arrogance on behalf of its leader, Gil Amelio. Apple bought NeXT, along with Steve, for over $400 million. In a MacWorld Keynote address (a biannual Apple Centric Technology Convention) that the Apple CEO gave, Steve Jobs said, There is one last thing. He was finally accepting the title of CEO instead of remaining the interim replacement that he had served as for 2.5 years. The thousands in attendance rose to their feet and applauded, chanting his name like a mantra, STEVE, STEVE, STEVE! Thank you, thank you. You guys are making me feel funny now because II get to come to work everyday and work with the most talented people on the planet. Its the best job in the world, he said.

In the months and years after Jobs return, he revolutionized desktop computer design with the companys best-ever seller, the iMac. With its translucent, colored plastics, the iMac was the forerunner of design elements of products in nearly every industry from consumer electronics to furniture. The man also rejuvenated the stale Mac OS operating system with OS X (pronounced Oh Es Ten), breathing life into the applauded NeXTSTEP technology, and marrying the usability of the classic Macintosh interface with a solid and secure UNIX core (the underlying code of an advanced modern operating system, shared by certain products). The operating system also brought unheard-of, jaw-dropping graphical elegance with features like real-time window shadowing, image scaling, and on-the-fly transparencies, a look that rival Microsoft attempted to emulate with its Windows XP release (a move that interestingly seemed to pay deference to the same interface war that was waged decades ago). Jobs also coined the Digital Hub strategy in early 2001, predicting that users would start using computers as a central hub for all of their electronic devices such as MP3 players, digital cameras, and even cell phones. Within months, one could see the entire industry beginning to lean towards the Digital Hub initiative. Jobs passion, the tangible hardware that he considers to be an art form, was also once again ignited as he helped craft works of utter beauty. These marvels include such products as a 23 wide-screen high-definition flat-panel monitor, the flat-panel ergonomically perfect iMac, a One-Inch-Thin Titanium laptop, and the iPod music player, which even garnered immense affection from Windows users. Who could forget, of course, what will probably go down in history as his greatest physical creation of all time: a seventeen-inch anamorphic notebook (the first of its kind) that writes DVDs (Including DVD Video) and features a back-lit keyboard that relies on ambient light sensors to determine the exact illumination of the keys depending on the environment.

Jobs success has not gone unnoticed. He has received the National Medal of Technology (1985, presented by President Regan), the Jefferson Award for Public Service (1987), was named Entrepreneur of the Decade by Inc. Magazine (1989), and received a Lifetime Achievement Award from PC Magazine (1997). Apple is also the only computer company to have won a Grammy Award (2001). Pixar Animation won an Academy Award for best Song (Monsters Inc. 2001).

Steve Jobs has been so strongly tied to the computer industry ever since its inception that it is difficult to imagine it in his absence. He successfully became the Jackie Kennedy of business and technology, a figure who was ubiquitous as a symbol of his times, but little known as a human being. Countless times he has set new standards for usability and performance, and in many ways, is the ultimate example of the American entrepreneur (CEO of Apple and Pixar). Steve is now only 48 years old and his vision is only now starting to take shape. He will be around for many years to come, as will Apple. He overcame seemingly insurmountable odds and achieved his goal, though in a way he could never have anticipated when the story began.

"We are reviewing some 9,000 recent UNHCR referrals from Syria. We are receiving roughly a thousand new ones each month, and we expect admissions from Syria to surge in 2015 and beyond." - Anne C. Richard, Assistant Secretary, Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration
 
ast3r3x
25 chars of wasted space.
 
Join Date: May 2004
Send a message via AIM to ast3r3x  
2004-11-09, 21:20

Like cheap wine it hasn't gotten better with age

I'm just kidding I didn't even read it. Well I vaguely remember you posting this a while ago I think, but I don't remember what I thought of it.
 
BarracksSi
BANNED
I am worthless beyond hope.
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Washington, DC
 
2004-11-09, 21:21

Quote:
Originally Posted by autodata
What jobs said ^^
Ditto to that -- that's exactly how I came to enjoy my first Mac.
 
pscates2.0
Mr. Farmiga
 
Join Date: May 2004
 
2004-11-09, 21:41

Holy crap. And I thought I posted long stuff. At least you went easy on the smileys!

 
Tuttle
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
 
2004-11-09, 22:35

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jules26
O.K. I'm doing some research for a marketing project on Apple users and their love of and devotion to everything Apple. So spare a few minutes- tell me what it is about Apple that's so special- enlighten me!!
A good start would be a better premise.

Apple users have absolutely no devotion to Apple and its products. If at the next Apple keynote Jobs introduced a new line of computer that were no different than the garbage Dell ships or a new iPod that was as clunky and retarded as the myriad iPod killers out there no one would buy them.
 
BarracksSi
BANNED
I am worthless beyond hope.
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Washington, DC
 
2004-11-09, 22:39

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tuttle
A good start would be a better premise.

Apple users have absolutely no devotion to Apple and its products. If at the next Apple keynote Jobs introduced a new line of computer that were no different than the garbage Dell ships or a new iPod that was as clunky and retarded as the myriad iPod killers out there no one would buy them.
Good point.

Apple happens to be the company that makes stuff I like to use. If they made crap, I'd go with someone else.
 
chipz
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Sicklerville NJ
 
2004-11-09, 23:01

I can say it in two words: APPLE WORKS!!!!
 
Ryan
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Promise Land of Trustafarians
 
2004-11-09, 23:23

Quote:
Originally Posted by chipz
I can say it in two words: APPLE WORKS!!!!
And he means two words.
 
Barto
Student extraordinaire
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Canberra, Australia
 
2004-11-09, 23:52

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tuttle
A good start would be a better premise.

Apple users have absolutely no devotion to Apple and its products. If at the next Apple keynote Jobs introduced a new line of computer that were no different than the garbage Dell ships or a new iPod that was as clunky and retarded as the myriad iPod killers out there no one would buy them.
Are you that sure? I remember during the mid 90's when Apple put out lemon after lemon and people still bought them... "keep the faith" and all that. It is like a faith during rough times.

The sky was deep black; Jesus still loved me. I started down the alley, wailing in a ragged bass.
 
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