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The truth about singers
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Messiahtosh
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Join Date: May 2004
 
2006-03-10, 02:55

How do amazing singers do what they do? I listened to this performance: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NDCbk...l%20jam%20live and was just utterly shocked at how outrageous Eddie Vedder's voice was/is in that live performance. What is it that happens to a person's vocal chords for them to be able to not only reach notes like that (or something ridiculous like Mariah Carey's octave control) and to sustain constant use of them? What separates their pipes from the average Joe's? It really fascinates me how a guy like Eddie Vedder came along, happened to be able to howl like he did, is artistic and just sort of was around at the right place and time to be able to show it off.

What's the secret to the singer?

I guess it's kind of like asking what's the secret to being tall - obviously it is genetic....but vocal chords can be looked at, specifically. In an age when we have shows like American Idol reaping amazing ratings, it'd be kind of fun to know if there is an inherent look that "good" vocal chords have that escapes the weaker voices.

Also, is it possible for people with weak voices to be able to strengthen and improve their voices to the point of becoming a singer? It's hard for me to imagine that it is possible, but I guess it could be? Interesting....to me anyway.

"We are reviewing some 9,000 recent UNHCR referrals from Syria. We are receiving roughly a thousand new ones each month, and we expect admissions from Syria to surge in 2015 and beyond." - Anne C. Richard, Assistant Secretary, Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration

Last edited by Messiahtosh : 2006-03-10 at 03:00.
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curiousuburb
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2006-03-10, 06:37

Substantial musculature of the vocal cords. Yep.
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drewprops
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2006-03-10, 07:18

I once had a singer to tell me that anyone could learn to sing. American Idol has convince me that she was full of biscuits.

also, I like EV and PJ but remember that "traditional", non "screamy" singers are far more remarkable than Eddie.

Steve Jobs ate my cat's watermelon.
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Brad
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2006-03-10, 11:21

Quote:
Originally Posted by drewprops
I once had a singer to tell me that anyone could learn to sing. American Idol has convince me that she was full of biscuits.
Well, don't discount that singer so quickly. Remember that the losers from American Idol have generally had zero professional training. Even many of the highly-ranked participants have not been professionally trained. So, these people are not really representative of what's possible.

The quality of this board depends on the quality of the posts. The only way to guarantee thoughtful, informative discussion is to write thoughtful, informative posts. AppleNova is not a real-time chat forum. You have time to compose messages and edit them before and after posting.
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Unch
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Join Date: Jun 2005
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2006-03-10, 11:34

And as James Blunt has proved, you don't even need to be able to sing to be a singer. An impersonation of a dying wilderbeast will suffice apparently.
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ast3r3x
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2006-03-10, 13:37

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unch
And as James Blunt has proved, you don't even need to be able to sing to be a singer. An impersonation of a dying wilderbeast will suffice apparently.
Just because it's not a standard voice doesn't mean it's not singing. He has an awesome voice that apparently millions of people like.

If you want to give an example of a bad voice being popular, stick with Dylan. Still the man though. …although his views on life are depressing.
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Mac+
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2006-03-10, 13:40

singing rocks ... wish I could do it - oh my goodness I'm drunk
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BuonRotto
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2006-03-10, 14:29

My sister sings professionally. She has taken countless hours of voice training lessons, tons of control exercises, warm-ups, etc. I think people consider singing like they see most other art talents, that you either have "it" or you don't. (Actually people thin kthe same thing about math it seems.) Of course there's talent, but if you don't train and work hard to develop refine and keep in physical and mental shape for it, you won't be your best. At the same time, people with otherwise ordinary talents can surpass those with natural gifts if they do these things while the talent simply coasts on what they have. Hard work beats talent when talent doesn't work hard.

I think the singing style pushed on American Idol, called melismatic, is horrible and it isn't indicative what what many professionals, artists and other singers would consider good singing. There isn't a best way to sing, just like there isn't a best way to paint of course. Anyway, just because you can hit 18 notes in each syllable of a song doesn't mean you should, and it doesn't really prove you have control of your voice, rather it can mask a lack of control.
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Windswept
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2006-03-10, 14:30

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac+
singing rocks ... wish I could do it - oh my goodness I'm drunk
Ah, but 'now' might be a good time to try singing, Mac+.

Your inhibitions are probably well and truly *gone*, for one thing.

Since you keep mentioning it, *what* are you drinking? Anything interesting? Just wondering.

Is it still Friday night there, or is it Saturday afternoon already?
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Wrao
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2006-03-10, 14:41

It's a mixed bag of nature and nurture. I have a 3 octave vocal range(2+ normal 1 falsetto) I can sing in tune(for the most part) and I understand harmony, melody and rhythm. Am I a good singer? Not really. Could I be a good singer? certainly. Could I ever be an amazing, jaw dropping, voice that makes you want to go save a bunch of kittens singer? Not likely, but I could be as good as I can be and I'm sure it would be good. I covered a D'angelo song some months ago. At the time I thought I did a decent job with the vocals, I listen to it today and cringe. I will not ever be able to sing like D'angelo, and if I try to, I will sound like a bad singer.

The thing about singing, good or bad, is that as much as the voice and abilities of the vocalist matter, the song and the context they are sitting in matters as much or more(in some cases). You can be a fairly crappy singer, but the songs that you write work with what you have and make your voice shine.

In some ways, all it takes to be a great singer is to be comfortable with your voice. That means knowing what you can do with it, and recognizing what you can't.

There are some truly exceptional voices out there, people who, when they sing you just feel good, their voice in and of its own is a wonderful instrument. There is a large amount of natural ability to that, but without practicing and developing their voice(By whatever means), it would never reach the level it gets.

So, basically. Anyone can be a singer(for the most part) but some people will be more inclined or less inclined naturally to excel at it. Barring some extremes of course, it's within just about anyone's ability to learn how to use their voice well.
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Unch
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2006-03-10, 15:02

Quote:
Originally Posted by ast3r3x
Just because it's not a standard voice doesn't mean it's not singing. He has an awesome voice that apparently millions of people like.
It's nothing to do with "non-standard", hell, I like "non-standard" over conventional. It's about the guy possessing absolutely no talent whatsoever. Not only can he not sing for toffee, but, as someone put it the other day, he "has the lyrical integrity of a 7 year old with a rhyming dictionary".

If the "millions" you're talking about are the record buying public, then it's probably a good idea to point out that 2Unlimited also sold millions of records, but that still doesn't make any part of their music "awesome"

I hate to be so cynical on a Friday evening, but it's nothing more than a package product, put together by a record company to hit a certain demographic.

Step 1. Find a prettyboy wannabe songwriter
Step 2. Get a half decent producer to do the record, while keeping the illusion it is "his"
Step 3. Bit of the right marketing, and product placement
Step 4. Profit!

The market is flooded with the same thing at the moment. How long it lasts before the industry wears out the novelty, who knows. It was kind of telling when he was given the Brit award for "Best Pop Act", and looked completely bemused by it, the poor clueless sod. Oh how the suits were chuckling about that one.

Incidentally, his speaking voice is pretty screwed up too, not that I can point fingers, after all I sounded like that when I was 13 and my voice started to break.

Of course there is the Emperor's new clothes aspect to it. Anyone who dares point out that his choruses (yes I've heard the whole album) sound like someone with a sore throat trying to pass a kidney stone is immediately branded one of several labels because they "don't get it".

I'm not usually this negative about stuff, but this guy really gets on my tits.

"It's like a new pair of underwear. At first it's constrictive, but after a while it becomes a part of you."
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Unch
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2006-03-10, 15:14

Something a bit more positive now...

I always wondered how people find their "voice". There are some pretty odd (I mean that in a good way) singing voices out there. How did those singers find that that was their style? I find it hard to think that's how they'd be naturally inclined to sing.

Personally I can't sing at all. I had my first bash at Karaoke about a month or so ago, and although I loved it, I sounded like crap. What's odd is that if I'm pissing about and singing in a Bee Gees style, or in a deep voice I'm more in tune than with my natural voice. (not hard I guess )

It's probably best that I keep it to myself (well except at the football stadium). Out of interest do supporters tend to sing or chant in American sports, or is it purely a Football type of thing?

"It's like a new pair of underwear. At first it's constrictive, but after a while it becomes a part of you."
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Messiahtosh
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Join Date: May 2004
 
2006-03-10, 15:57

Yeah, that's a good point about the singers finding their voice. Or how they'd be inclined to sing when it is kind of off-kilter and seemingly very different from how they speak. Take Chris Martin from Coldplay for example, when he speaks his voice is pretty average sounding but when he sings he goes into a wild falsetto (sometimes annoying) and it doesn't sound anything like his "natural" voice.

I wonder about guys that have that natural yodel to their voices too...it's pretty interesting. David Eugene Edwards is a good example of this....

http://phobos.apple.com/WebObjects/M...143441&i=53054

"We are reviewing some 9,000 recent UNHCR referrals from Syria. We are receiving roughly a thousand new ones each month, and we expect admissions from Syria to surge in 2015 and beyond." - Anne C. Richard, Assistant Secretary, Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration
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DMBand0026
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Join Date: May 2004
Location: Chicago
 
2006-03-12, 10:57

I can tell you from experience, about 16 years of it to be exact, that singing can be taught, to a certain point. I started singing when I was about 4 years old, obviously non professionally. I haven't ever really stopped. I've encountered a lot of singers over the years, ones who have had professional training and experience, and ones who haven't.

The ones who have had professional training do tend to improve a little, some, quite a bit, but professional training can't be the saving grace of someone who is just fundamentally bad at singing. What I'm saying, is that there's a certain amount of natural ability involved. Just the same as if someone is an athlete, I don't think anyone would disagree that the world's top athletes have a certain amount of natural ability involved in their talent. That's the same with singers, some people are just predisposed to being better at singing than others.

Yes, those who aren't born as the best can improve and become better, but I really think a lot of it has to do with congenital abilities. Both my parents are singers, and both sing professionally, my father is a choral teacher and humanities teacher at a high school, my mom was a music educator and now is the music director at a church.

Both of my brothers sing, my older brother didn't put as much time and effort in as I did, and never got professional training, so he never developed the abilities I did. My younger brother is well on his way to where I was at one point. I got professional training, sang professionally for a while, and even released a CD. I still sing quite a bit now, not much professionally anymore, but I do play several instruments professionally.

Anyway...I really think that a lot of vocal ability comes from natural ability. It can be furthered, vocal cord strength can be built up, lung capacity expanded...etc, but a lot of it has to come from natural ability.

Come waste your time with me
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Windswept
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2006-03-12, 21:53

Interesting, Sammy.

I enjoyed reading that - and picturing you singing as a little 4-yr. old.

When you were that young, did your parents sort of twist your arm to get you involved in singing, or did you show an interest in it on your own? Just wondering.
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BuonRotto
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2006-03-12, 22:56

Yeah, what DMB is saying applies to all subjects, but we seem to assume that for anything that isn't core curriculum (and even then really) it can't be taught and/or it can't be learned. It's simplistic, but it's the ol' nature vs. nurture dichotomy, when in fact it's always a bit of both. I'm always being told -- people swear to me that they can't draw but almost everyone has some means to draw and the aptitude to draw at some level of usefulness. Teaching people to draw observationally is eminently academic, teachable and learnable. drawing diagrams of information is also perfectly legit as a skill for anyone. That won't make you Picasso, but art doesn't have to be Art.
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Mac+
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2006-03-13, 01:18

Quote:
Originally Posted by Windswept
Ah, but 'now' might be a good time to try singing, Mac+.

Your inhibitions are probably well and truly *gone*, for one thing.

Since you keep mentioning it, *what* are you drinking? Anything interesting? Just wondering.

Is it still Friday night there, or is it Saturday afternoon already?
oh yeah - um, that was a bit before 3am on Saturday morning. I had just got back home and thought I'd have a quick look at 'an' since most of "you" would now be up.

I tried singing at a karaoke bar with some friends for the first time ever last year and whilst it was fun, I needed the booze to loosen up. This didn't make me a great singer. Then again, I am not a "recording artist" singer to start with, so the booze was more about losing inhibitions than affecting my voice.

For the record, I can hold a melody and harmonise. Like Wrao, I also know about pitch, rhythm, breath control, etc - but I don't practise this stuff, so I have not developed a voice that I would be proud to unleash upon the public. I can hold my own as a bv when the time comes, but lately I have not had cause to do so, so I'm beginning to doubt my ability there now just thinking of it.

All I want is a simple life
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DMBand0026
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2006-03-13, 01:45

Quote:
Originally Posted by Windswept
Interesting, Sammy.

I enjoyed reading that - and picturing you singing as a little 4-yr. old.

When you were that young, did your parents sort of twist your arm to get you involved in singing, or did you show an interest in it on your own? Just wondering.
Looking back on it, it was a bit of both. I started doing musical theater around that same age with the local park district and some child parts in local high school and college musicals/plays. I really enjoyed the theater aspect, but the singing I didn't care for much. It wasn't really until I joined the school choir in 4th grade that I started to enjoy singing as much as I did theater. After that I enjoyed both of them pretty much equally.

Come waste your time with me
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BarracksSi
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2006-03-13, 11:45

I don't sing, but I can fake an operatic style... lol

While the subject of professional musicianship is here, I figured that I'd put up a post from a tuba forum I frequent:

"How The Pros Practice
By Robert Gravelle

During the mixdown of Ivory Knight's Unconscience CD, I had the opportunity to work with guitar god Jeff Waters, the founder of the legendary Canadian metal band Annihilator. After one evening talking to him about music, it would be no exaggeration to say that I had learned more about the art of recording than I had in all my twenty years of playing music – and that includes four years of University studies! I'll admit that in Ottawa, we are sheltered from the outside world, so we don't get much influence from established industry pros, except through their albums. I had often wondered how top professionals approached their craft, and what made them different from all the hopefuls who can't quite get it together. Well, I finally got my chance to learn and now I'm going to share with you some of the things I learned in the hopes that you can avoid some of the common pitfalls that threaten the careers of aspiring musicians.
There are a number of differences between professional and amateur musicians but if I had to single out one above all others, it would be that the pros play with a much higher level of consistency. When you watch live performances, you'll notice that the players seldom make mistakes and they play all their parts very solidly, no matter how technically difficult the part. I used to think that there was such a thing as "good enough", especially when dealing with difficult passages. Not so in the pro world. In the big leagues:
NO MATTER HOW EASY OR HARD A PART IS TO PLAY, YOU MUST BE ABLE TO PLAY IT PERFECTLY.
It doesn't matter whether it's whole note chords or 32nd note arpeggios. Also keep in mind that any recording project has a fixed budget, which means that you have a set amount of time in which to put down your tracks. If you're struggling with playing your parts, in order to keep the project on budget, a producer will likely bring in a session player. Let me repeat that with more emphasis, in case it didn’t quite sink in the first time:
IF YOU CANNOT RECORD YOUR PARTS WITHIN A REASONABLE AMOUNT OF TIME, THE PRODUCER WILL LIKELY BRING IN A SESSION PLAYER!
In my amateur naiveté, I used to joke to my bandmates that I'd like to see them try to find someone who could lay down my rhythm parts in any reasonable amount of time! After talking to Jeff, I am convinced that they could and would replace me if I were to give them a reason to. That’s when it really hit me that:
AS A PROFESSIONAL MUSICIAN, YOU MUST BE ABLE TO PLAY CONSISTENTLY WELL UNDER PRESSURE
Playing music is a lot more fun than working in an office, but let there be no misunderstanding, with potentially large sums of money at stake, you are expected to do a job and do it well. Now I don’t mean to imply that you have to be some kind of virtuoso. Far from it. To be successful in the studio, a musician simply requires a strong sense for what a song needs and be able to capture those ideas on “tape” in a timely fashion. Live, consistency is one of the key components for giving each audience a good show for their hard earned money.
Practice Principles
As you might have guessed, to attain this level of proficiency, it takes a very specific approach to practicing - one that is surprisingly quite foreign to most players!
Everyone knows that practice makes perfect, but few people realize how much impact the quality of their practice sessions will have on their career. Most people focus too much on unimportant things and way too little on the really important stuff! For example, one of the biggest mistakes that amateurs make, myself included, is to equate chops with skill. Most amateurs try to hide their lack of solidity by throwing in a lot of licks and embellishments in their playing. Once in the studio, they quickly discover that music industry professionals are not fooled for one second by frivolous flashy parts. To them, sloppily executed licks just look ridiculous and merely detract from the song that they want to capture. Get in the habit of practicing to achieve solidity and consistency in every recording you do and leave the licks for when you can play your parts in your sleep.
PROS PRACTICE EXERCISES AND TECHNIQUES AS MUCH AS SONGS
I used to spend the vast majority of my time going over songs. Now, most of my practice time is allocated towards playing scales, chord progressions, and a variety of exercises aimed at improving my picking, fingering, fluidity, consistency, and timing. The idea behind this is that the better your technique is, the easier it is to put down songs solidly. At a recent drum clinic, drummer extraordinaire Mike Mangini remarked, "Music is not just art, but a skill as well. There are many talented musicians, but only a few skilled ones." He went on to say that one of the key traits that separate him from most musicians is the discipline to practice mundane and basic techniques over and over again until they are perfect.
PRACTICE EVERYTHING TO A METRONOME
Some people, including many, many drummers, feel that they can somehow avoid metronomes believing that they instinctively possess pretty good timing already. One of two things tends to happen to these people if their band is lucky enough to get signed. They either get replaced before the deal goes through or, if they are integral to the band because of creative input or image, they are relegated to watching the recording from the sidelines. The producer will know who practices to a click and who doesn't, and he or she will very likely bring in someone else, because it's too late to catch up at that point. This is especially true for drummers, since it’s extremely difficult to punch in drums.
General Tips for Practicing and Working with the Metronome
I asked my band's vocalist and multi-instrumentalist, John Devadasan Perinbam, for his thoughts on this subject. Here’s what he had to say:

1. I'd advise people to start with the metronome on SLOW! Every book I have read on drums and piano mentions this! That will help work the muscles that need it...and yield much better control.

2. George L. Stone recommends in his acclaimed book Stick Control to repeat each pattern twenty times without stopping before moving onto the next pattern. This forces the player to be conscious of counting the pattern, not just ripping through each pattern.

3. In my opinion the purpose of practice is to fine tune the muscle memory so that the muscles obey the brain with a minimum of conscious intervention - whether the practice is for music, sports, whatever...

4. WATCH FOR TENSION when you practice. Vocalists should practice in front of a mirror and observe posture, use one hand to feel the muscles under the jaw while practicing. If something feels like it is tensing, you're probably not doing it right.

5. I've heard many people say that they don't want to use a click track because they won't "feel" the music the same way. That's usually because they are not used to working with the click and they are "chasing" it rather than feeling the groove of the beat.

6. By the time you're ready for the studio, you should be able to play the parts in your sleep. There should be nothing that challenges the limits of your playing ability. If there is, then the parts are too difficult.

6b. By the same token, when it comes to recording, a simple part, played solidly and consistently, is infinitely preferable to a challenging part that is "hit-or-miss".

7. A point regarding discipline: always set goals that are attainable. The person that suddenly decides to allocate three hours a day for personal practice after twenty years of not practicing at all is likely the same person who is no longer practicing regularly after three or four months!

8. Learn another instrument, at least at a beginner level. At the very least, you'll get a different perspective of the music, and you'll be more understanding of your bandmate who regularly plays that instrument. Additionally as you become more proficient you'll likely develop your muscles more evenly than if all your attention is focussed on one instrument.

9. Allow time for new techniques to sink in. It takes time for information to filter through the conscious mind and stored in "muscle-memory". Patience.
Practicing everything to a metronome is a great habit to get into, and will put you leagues above most players, but there is more that you can do to make the most efficient use of your practice time. Most pros have very busy schedules. What with public appearances, business meetings, traveling, they have a lot less time for practicing than you might think! But that's OK, because:

PROS KNOW HOW TO MAKE THE MOST OF LIMITED PRACTICE TIME
Each time a professional musician sits down to practice, he/she knows what he/she is going to go over and for how long. Here is a sample practice session:

15 minutes of hand stretches and strengthening exercises.
1/2 hour of picking/timing exercises
15 minutes of scales played at different tempos
1 hour of rehearsing songs for evening's band practice

Depending on what needs more work and what kind of guitar player you are (IE: rhythm or lead guitar), your practice agenda could differ substantially from the one above. I strongly recommend that you have a look at John Petrucci's Rock Discipline instructional video for some useful guidelines. Just keep in mind that he represents the extreme far right of the pro player spectrum and is by no means “typical” in his degree of perfectionism. If you take it as the benchmark for what it takes to play at the highest level of technical proficiency, you can scale it back from there to determine how much is enough for you. For example, if you play rhythm guitar in a rock & roll style band, you would put most of your emphasis on strumming chords along with a click track and a lot less on pentatonic licks. What you would NOT do is reason that you want a loose feel, so you avoid using a click track! That's what an amateur would say and it won't serve you well in the studio.

Practicing for Tightness
Even playing along to a metronome every day is not enough to ensure that you are ready for recording. In case you haven’t yet enjoyed the thrill of recording, you’ll find that it is a lot different than playing in your living room. And the best way to prepare to do recording is to do some recording! I strongly recommend that you purchase a small portable digital studio for this purpose. You can snag one for a couple of hundred bucks and it could pay huge dividends for your career. Here’s how to use it. When ever you make up a part, put it down. Not only will that help you remember it, but it will also provide you with practical rehearsal for the real thing. Once you're satisfied with the performance, go ahead and double it, and then even triple it! I like to record a part ten times and then pan individual parts hard left and right so that I can hear how closely they match up. Ideally, you should be able to do this with any of the ten takes and they should all sound good. In reality, you will probably find that several of the parts that you thought were bang on are in fact less than rock solid! Once you can play the part and double it virtually every time, you’re ready for the real recording. I can remember too many occasions going over a part a zillion times to capture that one magic take. Lucky for me, I was recording in a home studio. I could never have gotten away with that in a real one. At the very least, I would have received a strong tongue lashing from the engineer. In a big budget scenario, the producer would have probably banished me from the recording and replaced me until I was ready to get down to business. The lesson here is that:

PROS RECORD ALL THEIR PARTS SEVERAL TIMES BEFORE ATTEMPTING THE “REAL” RECORDING
There are exceptions to all the rules I’ve outlined above, but you will find that the best and most sought after players do follow all these practices. Don’t let yourself become one of those artists who refuse to regiment their practicing because that they fear it will homogenize their playing, because, rest assured, these fears are simply unfounded. It can only help your cause to become proficient at your chosen instrument. So give these practices a try, and get yourself on the right path before you’re told to! Until next time, happy practicing!

Robert Gravelle
(Posted May 25, 2005)"
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sirnick4
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2006-03-13, 12:26

I think that article can best me summed up in two words: Practice Matters.

Singing is definitely an art. My personal opinion is that it is a gift given from somewhere (to avoid any religious talks ). And like some have already said, You can have all of the talent in the world, but if you don't practice the talent it is as good as nothing.

I am a "classical" singer at the University of Texas. I have been singing since elementary school. I love it

Singing is my life, and I can definitely say that practicing is VERY important. My major requires it, and if I don't, then my Voice Teacher can tell.

With singing, we are all on a continuum. There is always some area in which we can improve.

Deal with it.
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Wrao
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Join Date: May 2004
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2006-03-13, 13:32

Quote:
Originally Posted by sirnick4
I think that article can best me summed up in two words: Practice Matters.

I think it can be summed up better in this maxim:

"An amateur practices until they get it right. A pro practices until they never get it wrong"

I have a couple of problems with that article vs. playing and making music in general. But in terms of a professional studio situation, it is spot on.
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BarracksSi
BANNED
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Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Washington, DC
 
2006-03-14, 12:20

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wrao
I think it can be summed up better in this maxim:

"An amateur practices until they get it right. A pro practices until they never get it wrong"

I have a couple of problems with that article vs. playing and making music in general. But in terms of a professional studio situation, it is spot on.
I agree, there's a definite difference between typical performances and studio recording.

The ability to record music definitely changed the expectations of music performance. I can go watch the local symphony perform Holst's The Planets and only catch a few mistakes, or I could go to the store and buy a CD of one of the world's best orchestras executing the same music to sheer perfection.

When you put a musical performance "down on paper", so to speak, it's instantly part of a worldwide archive. If it's yet another performance of a previously-done work, it's also saddled with the burden of being compared to any other recording before or since. It HAS to be insanely good to even be noticed.

And, yes, in the studio, time is money, so the musicians need to be able to throw down a track that, while not as energetic or risk-defying as they might want to play, is accurate and clean enough to serve its purpose. It's no wonder that music track producers turn to synthesized music and Garageband loops for "good enough" musical background noises.
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Wrao
Yarp
 
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2006-03-26, 22:13

Hey I tried to sing!

Without Her

Recorded live in one take, last night at around 2 AM with no shirt on.
  quote
Messiahtosh
Apple Historian
 
Join Date: May 2004
 
2006-03-27, 08:05

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wrao
Hey I tried to sing!

Without Her

Recorded live in one take, last night at around 2 AM with no shirt on.


uhhhh
  quote
DMBand0026
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Chicago
 
2006-03-27, 15:40

Sometimes those kinds of things matter. I know people who claim to not be able to sing well if they're wearing shoes. Sometimes it's true. Whether it's psychological or not, I'm not sure, but it's surprisingly true.

Come waste your time with me
  quote
Wrao
Yarp
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Road Warrior
 
2006-03-27, 17:26

Quote:
Originally Posted by DMBand0026
Sometimes those kinds of things matter. I know people who claim to not be able to sing well if they're wearing shoes. Sometimes it's true. Whether it's psychological or not, I'm not sure, but it's surprisingly true.
Oh, I harbor no illusions I can sing well. Could be worse, but hey.
  quote
DMBand0026
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Chicago
 
2006-03-27, 17:29

I've heard much worse, I'll give you that.

And I liked it more than Messiahtosh apparently.
  quote
Dave
Ninja Editor
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Bay Area, CA
 
2006-03-27, 17:50

I've heard MUCH worse singing on the radio, Wrao.
  quote
turbulentfurball
Right Honourable Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Québec
Send a message via ICQ to turbulentfurball Send a message via AIM to turbulentfurball Send a message via MSN to turbulentfurball  
2006-03-27, 18:01

I've had to endure a Britney Spears concert. It was a bit of an eye-opener. (I don't mean her almost-nudity). She sang one song live, and it was horribly off key (It was Everytime). The worst thing was, she started playing a Piano at the beginning of the song. About half way through, she stood up, walked away and continued singing. The piano continued to play without her *As if by magic*.

It highlighted her complete lack of any musical talent, not just the singing.
  quote
DMBand0026
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Chicago
 
2006-03-27, 18:05

Thanks for telling us that she lip-syncs.

That is one of the industries' worst kept secrets. Her voice is doctored and enhanced endlessly for her albums and than is just regurgitated at the audience when she "performs" live on stage. It's like paying $200 to watch a stripper with 50,000 of your closest friends while a Spears album plays.

Personally, I'd rather just pay the stripper, skip the Spears, and move right on to the happy ending.

She's a no talent bum who was picked to become the next teen pop star because she was moderately physically attractive.

Come waste your time with me
  quote
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