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Musicals, plays, operas, dance, junkies, Egyptians
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Bryson
Rocket Surgeon
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: The Canadark
 
2006-04-06, 03:38

I work in a theatre dedicated to Contemporary Dance. Topless is mild, compared to some of the stuff we have scheduled. I recently did a show that involved one of those sex swings, full nudity, and a pole-dancing section.

I can also assure you that dancers really don't care about wandering around half-dressed (or even undressed.) You get used to it after a while.

I should also say that my job occasions me having to watch more contemporary dance than almost anyone else: So: Random Dance are amazing - incredibly intricate movements, strange, alienating music and lighting. Well worth watching. Rambert are good...but...they still tour stuff made in the 1990s and they really need to update it. If they're doing "Rooster" that's great - very accessible and understandable, and also entertaining. I think the best company I've seen is "Frantic Assembly" who sit somewhere between dance and abstract theatre. Some amazing stuff in that show.

Last edited by Bryson : 2006-04-06 at 03:50.
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mattf
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Devonshire - nearly twinned with Narnia
 
2006-04-06, 04:42

Ah, good questions Carol. I feel like I could talk about this all day.

Act I, Scene I:

I'm not really into musicals. I think the main reason for this is as you suggested - that I don't like the story to be interrupted by characters suddenly bursting into song. Having said that, on BBC Radio 2, Sarah Kennedy has a slot every morning for a showtune which I hear quite often. I quite like this, probably because it's in isolation. Actually, she played a song from Spamalot (sp?) the other day that I enjoyed. It was a parody of the usual love song that you get in musicals. Very clever. I'd quite like to see that musical.

Act I, Scene II:

I've seen a few plays (although not for a while). I think the best one I've seen is "The Complete Works of Shakespeare in 74 minutes" (or however many minutes it was) by the Reduced Shakespeare Company. Very clever, very witty and very frantic!

When I was at school (seems like a long time ago) we went to see a play which I can't even remember the name of! However, it was fascinating. It was held in old shipbuilding building next to the Clyde. The stage was split into three sections down the entire length of the building. When the action moved to another bit of the stage, the entire audience moved (I seem to remember a moving platform for the seated members and having to walk along some boards for the rest of us plebs). The play itself was based on The Great War and followed characters from an area of Glasgow as they went off to war.

Act I, Scene III:

Opera! Ah, now we come to my favourite cultural pasttime. I find opera to be a perfect blend of singing, orchestral music and acting. I love it. In fact, my birthday present is some opera tickets to go and see La Bohème.

My love for opera may seem to juxtapose with my lack of enthusiasm for musicals. All I can say is that with opera I see the songs as telling (most of) the story, whereas musicals I find the songs (mostly) interrupt the story. Just my take on it.

I once went to see an opera at L'Arena in Verona (Carmen, I think). It was an amazing night. During the first act we could also see a thunderstorm that travelled right around the city. Then, it changed direction and headed straight for us. As the heavens opened the entire cast scuttled off the stage. We sat in the rain for about 2 hours getting soaked to the skin. Finally it dried up, some skivvies came out on to the stage to mop it dry and the performance continued. The atmosphere of the place was just fantastic. I wanted to go and see Aida (most certainly not the Elton John version ) there but was never there at the right time.

If I'm feeling out of sorts, I get out my 3 record set of La Traviata, stick it on the turntable and just relax. Works every time.

I find that there's often a beautiful simplicity involved. Nothing can make me tear up as quickly as this interchange (from memory; not the greatest at best of times and my Italian is rusty to say the least)

Violetta: Prendete questo fiore... (Take this flower)

Alfredo: Perche? (Why?)

Violetta: Per riportalo. (To return it to me)

Alfredo: Quando? (When?)

Violetta: Quando sara appassito (When it's withered)

Alfredo: Oh ciel! domani... (Oh God! Tomorrow...)

Violetta: Ebben... Domani... (OK... Tomorrow...)

Alfredo: Io son, Io son felice! (I'm so, I'm so happy!)

Ridiculous, I know, but it gets me every time.

I was once trekking around Switzerland and Austria. Towards the end of my stay I stayed in Vienna. The guide book that I had with me mentioned that you could get extremely cheap tickets (a few euros) for the State Opera House if you went along on the night and were prepared to stand through the performance. So I went along one evening and stood in line for the cheap tickets. However, I couldn't see what was on. Not a single billboard. Ah well, I thought, it's so cheap it doesn't matter what it is. Bought my ticket and got my standing spot. Turns out that there wasn't any opera on that night. It was actually some contemporary dance (which really isn't my bag). I waited until the intermission and then scuttled off. Still, it was worth the few euros just to see inside the building. Magnificent!

Act II, Scene I:

I've been to quite a few concerts of the "other kind". From memory (and, therefore, probably missing out quite a few):

R.E.M. - I've seen them playing at Stirling Castle, Cardiff (Millenium Stadium) and somewhere else... Birmingham NEC, I think. They're a fantastic concert band. Very energetic and full of show.

Nick Cave - I've seen Nick Cave twice, once at Wolverhampton Civic Hall and once in Bristol (Colston Hall?). Both times I was in the back row and the acoustics were abysmal. He plays his concerts extremely loud and I was getting lots of reverb of the back walls. Still, it's amazing to watch him.

Elvis Costello - Again, I've seen him twice. The first time was probably the best concert I've ever been to. He played Glasgow Royal Concert Hall, did a 90 minute show and then a 90 minute encore (the last 30 minutes of which, he sent the rest of the band off, told the sound desk to go and sang acoustically). The second time I saw him was one of the worst concerts I went to. He obviously just couldn't be bothered, sang his set, went off. Very disappointing.

Ruben Gonzalez - (Actually, pretty much all of the Buena Vista Social Club crowd). Another fantastic night at the Glasgow Royal Concert Hall. Just indescribable watching these guys play. They had so much energy (especially considering their age).

RHCP - I went to Milan specifically to see RHCP play. Another fun night. Unfortunately the stage was so far away it was impossible to tell whether the bass guitarist really was just wearing an orange nappy (diaper) and nothing else. That's certainly what it looked like from where I was sitting.

Tom Waits - I went to Tom Waits' first concert in the UK for 17 years. I was so desperate to get tickets I told work that I'd be in late that day (the ticket line opened at 9am - Tickets sold out within 40 minutes or so). Fortunately, I got two tickets (costing me about £70 each). Unfortunately, I couldn't get anybody to go with me (philistines). Fortunately, I sold my spare ticket for more than I paid for two tickets (so I got to see Tom Waits for free!).

I've been to see a few things at the Birmingham Carling Hall (Polyphonic Spree and some others, can't remember who). That place is the worst fucking venue I've ever been to. It's a large room with a tall ceiling. However, there is a mezzanine level which covers up > 50% of the ground level. The only way to hear the concert properly is to stand in a small area directly in front of the stage. Of course 5000 other people are trying to do the same. I have a bit of a crowd phobia (for reasons I won't go into in this thread - this post is too long already ) so I ended up at the back of the room well out of other people's way. The acoustics are shitty beyond belief.

Some of the nicest music events I've been to are folk music sessions in The Tron in Edinburgh (now, very sadly, closed to make way for yet another student pub).

EDIT:? What edit?
EDIT2: It's indescribable the typos I can make.

Last edited by mattf : 2006-04-06 at 17:19.
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thegelding
feeling my oats
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: there are nice people here...that makes me happy
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2006-04-06, 07:42

mmm, lots of fun at hairspray...amazing energy, very colorful...lots of singing and dancing...and, at my age and also having lived in baltimore and met john waters quite a few times, i got all the jokes and loved the setting

my daughter enjoyed it too

thinking of getting tickets for my other daughter and have her take my neice who is 9 and flying in from baltimore this weekend...though my youngest is only 16 and a bit naive about life i think i can trust her to drive to a play with a 9 year old and get home alive and well...but i could be wrong about that...maybe i should go too

i don't know if i could list all the music shows i've been to...and quite a few with the girls too (most recent was coldplay...i think my eldest fell in love with apple's dad that night)...but i do remember being so proud when i saw my daughter go crowd surfing by at a The Ataris concert...twice....wasn't as happy to find out that, at 14, she was invited back to the band trailer...luckily she said no

g

crazy is not a rare human condition

everything is food if you chew hard enough
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bassplayinMacFiend
Banging the Bottom End
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
 
2006-04-06, 09:10

I caught a SLOCO production of The Gondoliers a few years back that was quite entertaining. Other then that I played violin in a Peter & the Wolf production when I was a kid and spent two years as first chair violin in the town orchestra (again when I was 10-11).

In my area we are lucky to have multiple performing arts (Hartford Ballet, Hartford Stage, The Bushnell, Hartford Symphony) companies. I'd like to see some more symphony and ballet. Thanks to this thread I think I'll look up some symphonic ticket info.

Our company is sponsoring the local United Arts Council fundraiser this week. Two days ago I had a fun maskmaking session/lesson with the mask designer for The Bushnell who recently did the masks for the production of "The Lion King" which is currently on stage here.

We usually drum up about 100K or so for the local arts scene. As an employee my ID gives me perqs like free admission to the local art gallery (Wadsworth Atheneum, the first public art museum in the US) and 2 for 1 prices for tickets and stuff.
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xionja
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
 
2006-04-06, 09:35

Culture: I am the least cultured person in my family. Were your classic jewish/music/literature/academia family, but I was raised in upstate NY and absorbed as much guns/motorcycles/cheap beer culture as jew-culture.

My sister is a baroque cellist/viola de gamba player, she's still in school, but we get to listen to her on NPR from time to time, we've also gone to see her play at the Kennedy center (fun!). Throughout my life I've gotten taken along to all sorts of classical music events that I ought to appreciate No, I definatly have fun at classical music events. My sister put on her own Purcell opera, this huge project her school bankrolled. I didn't get to see it, but apparently it was near-professional. I am claiming culture by association to my sister.

I've never seen a musical or a play, I'm not sure I could sit through one, can't watch movies either But in NYC, I have seen the Alvin Ailey dance group, an african-american ballet-ish group. I know nothing about dance, but it was a completely fantastic show!

I like/d reading Shakespeare plays aloud. When I was a kid, till 10 or so, my family and some family friends would get together a few times a year and read a whole play outloud over the course of a few evenings. It was great fun, lots of kids trying their hardest to read Shakespeares lines without tripping over words, though I realize now that all the grown-ups were drinking profusely; probably why they let the kids have all the parts. When I was eight my family read Julius Caesar in this tiny room in Rome, good fun, my dad was caesar, we got to stab him.

When I lived in Poland as a kid, I remember going to tons of events, none of which I remeber now! Alas. I suppose its somewhere in my deep unconscious.

Other concerts:

Snoop Dogg and The Game, for free, with free beer, on a warm sunny day outside. Can't beat that.
Ben Folds + Belle and Sebastian, fun, but not my sort of music
Guster - amazing concert, even for a band I only mildly like, their onstage energy was unbeatable. One of the funnest performances I've ever seen.
Apparently I've seen the indie rock band Secret Machines, but they mustn't have made much of an impression on me
Keith Frank is always awesome. He plays till the sun comes up . . . literally.
Seen lots of bands at music festivals/bars/shows ect. . . too many to list.

Edit: Remembered the best show ever: Bruce Lockwood and Glenn Davis with Pete Panek and the Blue Cats. It happens once or twice a year in Ithaca, NY. Not something to miss. Pete Panek plays on his own every monday, which is fantastic. Sweet electric blues, and funny old people dancing.

Last edited by xionja : 2006-04-06 at 09:55.
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Banana
is the next Chiquita
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
 
2006-04-06, 09:45

Recently went to a high school production about My Fair Lady. Enjoyed it and has been too long; I used to go to plays quite often when I was a tyke and during my early college years. I've always loved plays, as they tell story very differently than your idiot box tells it. Though, a production laden with music bores me to tears, like Nutcracker.
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Kickaha
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
 
2006-04-06, 11:40

Quote:
Originally Posted by mattf
I was once trekking around Switzerland and Austria. Towards the end of my stay I stayed in Venice. The guide book that I had with me mentioned that you could get extremely cheap tickets (a few euros) for the State Opera House if you went along on the night and were prepared to stand through the performance. So I went along one evening and stood in line for the cheap tickets. However, I couldn't see what was on. Not a single billboard. Ah well, I thought, it's so cheap it doesn't matter what it is. Bought my ticket and got my standing spot. Turns out that there wasn't any opera on that night. It was actually some contemporary dance (which really isn't my bag). I waited until the intermission and then scuttled off. Still, it was worth the few euros just to see inside the building. Magnificent!
Are you sure you don't mean Vienna? Venice is in Italy.

I did the same thing, actually... and it was Madame Butterfly. GORGEOUS. The standing bit was a bit harsh after several hours, but it was worth it.
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Windswept
On Pacific time
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Moderator's Pub
 
2006-04-06, 13:14

Quote:
Originally Posted by xionja
Culture: I am the least cultured person in my family. We're your classic jewish/music/literature/academia family, but I was raised in upstate NY and absorbed as much guns/motorcycles/cheap beer culture as jew-culture.


God, xionja, your statement is just classic. I love it.

Guns, motorcycles, cheap beer, indeed.

Quote:
My sister is a baroque cellist/viola de gamba player, she's still in school, but we get to listen to her on NPR from time to time, we've also gone to see her play at the Kennedy center (fun!). Throughout my life I've gotten taken along to all sorts of classical music events that I ought to appreciate No, I definatly have fun at classical music events. My sister put on her own Purcell opera, this huge project her school bankrolled. I didn't get to see it, but apparently it was near-professional. I am claiming culture by association to my sister.
Wow!

Quote:
I realize now that all the grown-ups were drinking profusely; probably why they let the kids have all the parts.


Another classic. I can't help laughing as I picture that scene.

I have to recommend, xionja, that if you aren't already doing so, you should start keeping a journal of your thoughts and the notable events in your life. Why? Because down the road, you just *have* to write a book about all of it.

It wouldn't necessarily be the events 'themselves' that would interest people; but rather *your* particular take on them, and your general observations. I have to think that much of the book would be extremely funny, because YOU, my dear, are a classic yourself. I'll get in line now to be your first book customer.

Oh, and more advice. Start making a comprehensive list of questions you'd like to ask your older relatives - about their own lives and experiences - so that you can do some 'family history' interviews. Be sure to get your interviews on tape. When you're older, I think you'll be *very* glad you did.
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Windswept
On Pacific time
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Moderator's Pub
 
2006-04-06, 14:33

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bryson
I work in a theatre dedicated to Contemporary Dance. Topless is mild, compared to some of the stuff we have scheduled. I recently did a show that involved one of those sex swings, full nudity, and a pole-dancing section.
It would take *ten thousand miracles* for such a show to be staged here in the US.

The 'topless' production probably squeaks by here because the 'fundies' don't find out about it - not being theatergoers. *smirk*

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Windswept
On Pacific time
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Moderator's Pub
 
2006-04-06, 14:59

Wow, Matt. Thanks for this amazing post. I know you're an Aries, but I think you must have a Leo moon sign, because you really go all out when you undertake to do something.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mattf
Ah, good questions Carol. I feel like I could talk about this all day.
I'm happy to hear that!

Quote:
I'm not really into musicals. I think the main reason for this is as you suggested - that I don't like the story to be interrupted by characters suddenly bursting into song.
I'm glad to hear that I'm not the only one who feels this way. Having said 'that', I think I'll go ahead and get tickets for the 'whorehouse' and 'pinafore' musicals. I can get them for a reduced price through my local rec center. The latter is a 'dinner theater' production. I wonder if that aspect vastly changes the show itself?

Quote:
It was a parody of the usual love song that you get in musicals. Very clever. I'd quite like to see that musical.
Sounds great!

Quote:
I've seen a few plays (although not for a while). I think the best one I've seen is "The Complete Works of Shakespeare in 74 minutes" (or however many minutes it was) by the Reduced Shakespeare Company. Very clever, very witty and very frantic!
Was that put on by a touring company?

Quote:
The stage was split into three sections down the entire length of the building. When the action moved to another bit of the stage, the entire audience moved
Oh, I just read somewhere about a performance like that. Now I'm going to wrack my brain until I remember what it was.

Quote:
Opera! Ah, now we come to my favourite cultural pasttime. I find opera to be a perfect blend of singing, orchestral music and acting. I love it. In fact, my birthday present is some opera tickets to go and see La Bohème.

My love for opera may seem to juxtapose with my lack of enthusiasm for musicals. All I can say is that with opera I see the songs as telling (most of) the story, whereas musicals I find the songs (mostly) interrupt the story. Just my take on it.
Makes perfect sense to me, and encourages me to give operas another try. I saw Carmen when I was 18... a year or two ago.

Quote:
I once went to see an opera at L'Arena in Verona (Carmen, I think). It was an amazing night. During the first act we could also see a thunderstorm that travelled right around the city. Then, it changed direction and headed straight for us.
I think such a performance staged outdoors would be incredible. Being able to see a thunderstorm in the distance seems tremendously exciting to me, and a magnificent addition to the drama of the evening.

Quote:
I find that there's often a beautiful simplicity involved. Nothing can make me tear up as quickly as this interchange (from memory; not the greatest at best of times and my Italian is rusty to say the least)
Ah, see, that's where you're lucky. Knowing 'any' Italian would seem to vastly affect the quality of one's experience with opera.

I have to run now. Will try to finish (and edit) this later.

Last edited by Windswept : 2006-04-06 at 21:04.
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mattf
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Devonshire - nearly twinned with Narnia
 
2006-04-06, 15:23

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kickaha
Are you sure you don't mean Vienna? Venice is in Italy.
Edit? What edit?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kickaha
I did the same thing, actually... and it was Madame Butterfly. GORGEOUS. The standing bit was a bit harsh after several hours, but it was worth it.
You can keep your fancy Doctorate and what-have-you, but THIS, I am jealous of

Last edited by mattf : 2006-04-06 at 17:12.
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GSpotter
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: A small town near Wolfsburg, Germany
 
2006-04-06, 16:32

I) For years, I resolved to visit a Musical (never been to one so far). From my current office, I even have a view to a big musical building (currently they play 'Elisabeth' and 'Mamma Mia'), but somehow I never could pull myself together (I missed Miss Saigon, Phantom of the Opera, Dance of the Vampires, Cats - to name a few...).
A few years ago, I went to Carmina Burana, presented on the "Thingstätte" in Heidelberg (an Amphittheater).

To sum it up, I'm quite a philistine

II) When I was younger, I've seen a bunch of Rock concerts, but for the last years, I only attended Jethro Tull concerts - I like the fact that they are an old fashioned group that put their emphasis on the live music.

My photos @ flickr
The man who trades freedom for security does not deserve nor will he ever receive either. -- Benjamin Franklin
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bassplayinMacFiend
Banging the Bottom End
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
 
2006-04-06, 18:57

Yea, Jethro Tull is excellent live.

I've seen many live concerts but I think the best I saw was Pink Floyd at Yankee Stadium in '94. (Yes, I know, Roger Waters wasn't performing but it was still a damn fine show.)

The next best would probably be Leon Russell & Edgar Winters opening for the Jerry Garcia Band at the Kaiser Theatre on Halloween '98. Then there were the 4 Rush shows I've seen, one in which Primus opened for them. Santana with Burning Spear kicked tail too. Man, so many concerts, wish I could've recorded them all...
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Mac+
9" monochrome
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: 🇦🇺
 
2006-04-06, 19:38

Ah the Tull - Ian Anderson guests on Toto's latest effort with a flute solo (natch) and ... (dare I do it? - it certainly doesn't warrant it, as it is not their best effort) "Yacht Rock" provides a ye olde english perspective on how the Tull have left their mark on music too.

(Oh what the heck ... see episode 6 - but eps 7 and 8 see them back in form.)

All I want is a simple life
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Paul
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: New York City
 
2006-04-07, 02:12

Quote:
Originally Posted by Windswept
I just missed seeing Stomp!

I would *really* like to have seen that.

Has anyone seen it?

Was it worth seeing?
I saw it my freshman year... It was fairly decent, but nothing terribly awe-inspiring...
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mattf
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Devonshire - nearly twinned with Narnia
 
2006-04-07, 03:44

Quote:
Originally Posted by Windswept
[Re: Spamalot] Sounds great!
Well, maybe, you had to be there. There're various snippets of songs from the production on the website.

Quote:
Was that put on by a touring company?
Yes. See http://www.reducedshakespeare.com/shakespeare.html
Quote:
Makes perfect sense to me, and encourages me to give operas another try. I saw Carmen when I was 18... a year or two ago.
Ha! You write far too eloquently and thoughtfully for THAT to be true. I don't know, next you'll be asking us to believe you're a virgin.
Quote:
I think such a performance staged outdoors would be incredible. Being able to see a thunderstorm in the distance seems tremendously exciting to me, and a magnificent addition to the drama of the evening.
Being outdoors really does add to the experience. The thunderstorm was just superb. Even getting soaked didn't put a dampener on the evening.

A little aside: My boss (at the time I went to L'Arena) loved opera too. He'd been there too and ended up sitting amongst a load of locals. They treated the whole experience rather like they were just meeting up at a café. They stopped talking to listen to their favourite arias, but the rest of the time they chatted to each other. They even had a radio with them to listen to the football matches. That kind of behaviour would get you lynched here (and probably in a lot of places). Oh, to be Italian.
Quote:
Ah, see, that's where you're lucky. Knowing 'any' Italian would seem to vastly affect the quality of one's experience with opera.
Well, it doesn't have to be Italian. Know any French, Spanish or German? (Although, German-language operas are a whole different beast for me. They have to be. "Ich liebe dich" just doesn't have any of the romance when compared to "Ti amo" or even "Je t'aime") You could even go to an English-sung opera (the production of La Bohemè I'm going to see next week is English-sung; while I'd prefer otherwise, it might make it a bit easier for ma lassie, who's never been to an opera before).

One thing I would suggest, if you're thinking of going to an opera for the first time (or after a break of *ahem* a couple of years), is to do it to excess. Dress up in your gladrags, drink champagne during the interval, have a pre/post-dinner. It just adds to the entire experience. You can always do the standing-up-for-two-hours-but-only-paying-three-euros-for-the-experience thing that Kickaha did once you know whether you like the artform.
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Windswept
On Pacific time
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Moderator's Pub
 
2006-04-08, 17:56

Didn't get a chance to answer your post today, Matt.

Right now, I'm off to change clothes to go see that topless dance company.

Will give some feedback on the performance tomorrow.



Oh, about the virgin thing...

...I am a frail delicate flower... and *certainly* virginal.

After all, AppleNova demands the highest standards of purity and goodness in all aspects of its being.


*brief burst of song from the angels on high*


Now see, did you hear 'that'? Certain proof of the veracity of my claim.

(Aren't you glad you asked? )
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Banana
is the next Chiquita
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
 
2006-04-08, 18:28

Hmm... You had an ex, didn't you?

Must be a first. Virgin Divorce...

Incidentally, does it smell like bull here just now?
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Chinney
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Ottawa, ON
 
2006-04-08, 22:23

Quote:
Originally Posted by GSpotter

[...]

II) When I was younger, I've seen a bunch of Rock concerts, but for the last years, I only attended Jethro Tull concerts - I like the fact that they are an old fashioned group that put their emphasis on the live music.
My cousins over there love the Tull. Must be a Stuttgart thing.
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mattf
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Devonshire - nearly twinned with Narnia
 
2006-04-10, 09:12

Quote:
Originally Posted by Windswept
Right now, I'm ... topless...
How was it for you?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Windswept
Oh, about the virgin thing... ...snip Carol's drunken rambling...



(Aren't you glad you asked? )
Indeed.

Internet Forums: Where your delusions of grandeur can be presented as reality.
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Windswept
On Pacific time
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Moderator's Pub
 
2006-04-11, 12:37

Quote:
Originally Posted by mattf
I would love to see their "Complete History of America" and "Western Civilization: The Complete Musical". I did locate their US touring schedule for 2006-2007. Thanks for the link. I might be able to catch one of their performances.

http://www.reducedshakespeare.com/tour-us.php

Quote:
Ha! You write far too eloquently and thoughtfully for THAT to be true.
Ah, verbal praise... one of my favorite things. Thanks for the kind words.
Quote:
I don't know, next you'll be asking us to believe you're a virgin.
Indeed!

Quote:
Being outdoors really does add to the experience. The thunderstorm was just superb. Even getting soaked didn't put a dampener on the evening.
The Santa Fe opera was outdoors, under an exuberantly starry sky. I loved that aspect of the experience so very much.

Quote:
[snip]...the rest of the time they chatted to each other. They even had a radio with them to listen to the football matches. That kind of behaviour would get you lynched here (and probably in a lot of places). Oh, to be Italian.
Yeah, here they'd be escorted 'out' instantly, accompanied by a lot of outraged looks from nearby audience members.

Quote:
Well, it doesn't have to be Italian. Know any French, Spanish or German?
Fairly fluent Spanish, and a smattering of once-decent French.

In German, I can say: "Where is the streetcar stop? It is there, on the corner." Such useful remarks. I can't tell you how helpful they have been throughout my travels; and they 'sound' pretty impressive too.
Quote:
One thing I would suggest, if you're thinking of going to an opera for the first time (or after a break of *ahem* a couple of years), is to do it to excess. Dress up in your gladrags, drink champagne during the interval, have a pre/post-dinner. It just adds to the entire experience. You can always do the standing-up-for-two-hours-but-only-paying-three-euros-for-the-experience thing that Kickaha did once you know whether you like the artform.
Your recommendation sounds like fun, Matt. If you were to suggest two operas that a novice might enjoy, what would they likely be?

Last edited by Windswept : 2006-04-11 at 18:58.
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Windswept
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Join Date: May 2004
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2006-04-11, 12:56

Quote:
Originally Posted by mattf
How was it for you?

Quote:
Internet Forums: Where your delusions of grandeur can be presented as reality.


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Kickaha
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Join Date: May 2004
 
2006-04-11, 13:05

Quote:
Originally Posted by mattf
You can always do the standing-up-for-two-hours-but-only-paying-three-euros-for-the-experience thing that Kickaha did once you know whether you like the artform.
*Two*?

Try six to seven. :P Had to stand in line to get tickets, and since it's such a deal, people start queuing up around noon for a 6pm show. I got there mid-afternoon, and still just squeaked in. By the time it was all said and done, I'd been on my feet for around seven hours.

It was still worth it. (yes, I'm going to rub it in as well as I can... )
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Windswept
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2006-04-11, 13:19

Update:

Saturday night topless dance company -

We sat nice and close - second row from the front of the stage.

Murbeau would have loved the two topless female dancers.

I was rather adrift in the first half of the performance, but 'loved' the second; so the experience was definitely worthwhile.

At the end of one scene, all six dancers stripped naked and bathed under a waterfall - with actual water falling across the entire length of the back of the stage. (They were facing 'away' from the audience, btw. )

Sunday night Sherlock Holmes play -

Enjoyed this a lot. The script was an original adaptation of the two stories "A Scandal in Bohemia" and "The Final Problem".

Wrt the *wonderful* scenery, at one point, some upper-story windows had London fog floating past the glass for at least a half hour. I loved that.

Went to a lecture 'last' night, and a NHL hockey game is coming up on Thurs. night. Yay!
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Kickaha
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Join Date: May 2004
 
2006-04-11, 13:26

Sounds like fun.

Did you take dollar bills??
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DMBand0026
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Join Date: May 2004
Location: Chicago
 
2006-04-11, 13:33

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kickaha
Sounds like fun.

Did you take dollar bills??


That sounds like something I'd really enjoy. Strip clubs aren't something I've ever really been able to get into, but that sounds like something that's really awesome while not being overtly sexual just for the sake of being sexual. However, it seems like a really genuinely sexual thing without the, "I'll make you think I'll have sex with you if you stuff more $20s into my g string" feeling.

Come waste your time with me
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Kickaha
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Join Date: May 2004
 
2006-04-11, 13:40

You need to get to Montreal then, DMB.

My wife and I had a *great* time at Kama Sutra in the Latin Quarter. They *danced* first and foremost, and some were just incredible. The fact that they were doing so while naked was just icing.

But yeah, the whole $20/3min thing is just kinda silly IMO. I mean it's just kind of degrading to all participants, y'know? (That reminds me, I need to save up... )
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DMBand0026
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Join Date: May 2004
Location: Chicago
 
2006-04-11, 14:22

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kickaha
You need to get to Montreal then, DMB.

My wife and I had a *great* time at Kama Sutra in the Latin Quarter. They *danced* first and foremost, and some were just incredible. The fact that they were doing so while naked was just icing.

But yeah, the whole $20/3min thing is just kinda silly IMO. I mean it's just kind of degrading to all participants, y'know? (That reminds me, I need to save up... )

It's not even the high price or the asinine idea of giving a woman money for taking her clothes off, it's just that strip joints seem to be populated by dirty old men who have all come up with the fantastically inaccurate idea that if they give the girls money, they'll not only take (most) of their clothes off, but they'll have sex with them too. Yes, in some clubs the girls really will take the guys into back room and do their thing, but that's the exception, not the rule. Not to mention, it's illegal in most cases.

I just don't understand spending $150 for a girl to take her top off and dance in front of you for 4 minutes. Most clubs aren't even fully nude.

However, what you and Carol have described sounds wonderful to me. I'm more of the, "appreciate the human form because it's beautiful, not because I can have sex with it" type. Not that I'm opposed to sex, touching...etc, but there's something about a stripper that's just not really, for lack of a better word, sexy. Imagining a beautiful woman actually dancing (not stripping...that's stripping, not dancing) either partially or fully nude just sounds great to me. I'm not exactly a horn dog (well, we all have a little horn dog in us ) but I really think I'd enjoy something like that a lot. Like I said, it's not something that's overtly sexual, but it's something so wonderfully sensual that it's exciting. I think that's enjoying the human form in all its glory in the best kind of way.

Come waste your time with me
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Kickaha
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Join Date: May 2004
 
2006-04-11, 14:25

Ayup yup.

I've seen strippers that just kind of stood there and swayed side to side - boring. I don't care *how* good she looks, when she's just acting bored, it's boring.

When a dancer is actually dancing sensually though, they can be fully clothed and still *whammo* you get that erotic charge. If they're nude, then that's just a bonus.

Yeah, Kama Sutra, Montreal, definitely. (Now don't get me wrong, there were obviously BJ booths in the back, but the stage work was outstanding.)
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Windswept
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Join Date: May 2004
Location: Moderator's Pub
 
2006-04-11, 19:15

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kickaha
Sounds like fun.

Did you take dollar bills??


It was an international dance company. Remember this pic from page one of this thread?



Well, the dancers looked much better in person.

For some pics of the dancers with clothes on, skim down to the 4th paragraph of the article at this link, and click on "Go to Slide Show".

http://www.nytimes.com/2004/11/07/ar...xiCCpByoE5arSQ
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