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Moogs
Hates the Infotainment
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: NSA Archives
 
2007-06-25, 15:32

Hey Murbot, have you topped that 175mph sissy-speed record of yours? I mean seriously why don't you grow a pair?
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Dorian Gray
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Paris, France
 
2007-06-25, 16:34

Unless you can afford a pair of Lightweight wheels (about $6k, which hasn't stopped pro cyclists paying for them out of their own pockets when their sponsors have baulked at coughing up) I'd stay far away from wheels with low spoke counts. They're fast, so possibly justifiable for racing (though decent ones are always expensive) but for jumping curbs on a commute? No chance. They'll be out of true after your first ride and broken in no time. No exaggeration.

Quote:
Originally Posted by thegelding
wish the buzz came with a carbon fork or that the road warrior had disc brakes
If I had to choose between a carbon fork or disc brakes I'd go with the carbon fork, personally. Nice comfortable ride which you can enjoy all the time. The brakes on the other hand are rarely used.

As for the groupset, I'm not sure it's so awfully important. I'd be surprised if you could find 105 on a sub-$1000 bicycle (here in the UK you can't), but if you can I s'pose t'would be nice.

… engrossed in such factional acts as dreaming different dreams.
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thegelding
feeling my oats
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: there are nice people here...that makes me happy
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2007-06-25, 22:51

how about this bike...a bit more...but disc brakes with carbon fork

scott sub

g


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AWR
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: State of Flux
 
2007-06-26, 03:34

g, that Scott looks quite nice for what you plan to do. I think money spent on a carbon fork and decent mid-range components is well spent. I would strongly suggest sticking with Shimano 105 or its equivalent or better. The stuff is lighter and stronger, and stays "tuned" for quite a bit longer than low-end components. I also think disc brakes - while not necessary - are a nice upgrade.

My only concern regarding this model is the geometry of the pictured set-up. The riding position looks quite agressive for a bike that you plan to use for commuting. It might just be the image, but it looks like the rider would be stretched out a bit, which is goood for going down hills in the forest (and for lowering your wind resistance) but not necessarily necessary or wanted (and certainly less comfortable) if riding on roads to work. That said, it seems from the specs that the handbar stem is adjustable, and perhaps would allow you to adjust it to a less aggressive, more comfortable pitch. I'm not advocating a shopping bicycle with a basket, but at your age comfort should be one of your concerns.

I would also suggest giving a couple a test ride. Maybe even this Cannondale, which has a HeadShok with a convenient lockout. This would be useful if you ever ride on dirt paths, for example.

http://www.cannondale.com/bikes/07/c...model-7BS.html
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Eugene
careful with axes
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Hillsborough, CA
 
2007-06-26, 07:38

Yeah, looks like they just put a rigid fork and slicks on a mountain bike frame and classified it as a road/commuter. if you're going to get a mountain frame, you may as well get a mountain fork too...it'll smooth out potholes and speed bumps for your shoulders, and weight isn't really a factor anyway. As for your rear...natural padding and a thicker seat would be plenty of shock absorption there.

The Scott pictured looks like it has a seat more suited to competition than comfort.

Also since weight isn't really a factor for a commuter bike, a lush chromoly frame would further cushion your ride.

Two of my favorite steel frame builders in the past have been SyCip and Independent Fabrications, though it looks like SyCip has completely forsaken their heritage for carbon, aluminum and titanium now.
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thegeriatric
geri to my friends
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Heaven
 
2007-06-26, 08:29

No No No. Leg wont lift high enough anymore Haven't had my leg over for years. (We are still talking bikes by the way)
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zippy
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Unknown
 
2007-06-26, 08:41

Quote:
Originally Posted by thegeriatric View Post
No No No. Leg wont lift high enough anymore Haven't had my leg over for years. (We are still talking bikes by the way)
Sure we are.

g, unless you are planning to also do some mountain/trail riding with the bike, I'd stick with a more traditional road design. Besides being more comfortable for longer rides, I believe the tires are bigger in diameter, and the whole gear ratio is better as a result. Something like Cannondale Road Warrior you pictured seems best.

Of course disc brakes aren't typically found on road bikes, but a good quality bike should have good quality rim brakes so you'll still be able to stop. The disc brakes really shine in sloppy weather - something you indicated you won't have to worry much about - but they also add weight and $$.

I'd check out what Trek and Specialized have to offer in this price range if you haven't already.

Do you know where children get all of their energy? - They suck it right out of their parents!
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AWR
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: State of Flux
 
2007-06-26, 09:14

I've enjoyed seeing all the nice bikes the ANers hit the roads and trails on - some impressive and just fun specimens. I love cycling and wish I could do more of it! I bought my first road bike about 6 years ago (always a "mountain" biker before that) after becoming obsessed with Le Tour de France, and have enjoyed learning about road-riding.

Now, I've just received a new (self-selected ) mountain bike from the wife and kids as a birthday present to compliment my road miles. This is my first bike with any type of suspension, and it's been a blast.

So here she is just after the presentation, a BMC Fourstroke FS 03. Specs include: lightweight aluminum/aluminium frame, Shimano XT component set (with the exception of DT Swiss rims and Crank Brother pedals), Fox F100 front shock, DT Swiss SSD 190L rear shock.... The riding position is great for me, very comfortable on long rides, and yet I don't feel vulnerable on steep decents, or like I'm the main sail of Alinghi when riding into the wind.

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Dorian Gray
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Paris, France
 
2007-06-26, 14:28

That is a very handsome bike, AWR, you lucky thing. Nice pedal choice too. But I'd love to know why you chose a Swiss machine instead of a handmade American frame, which I remember you were considering at one point.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eugene
As for your rear...natural padding and a thicker seat would be plenty of shock absorption there.

The Scott pictured looks like it has a seat more suited to competition than comfort.
This is strange advice. Soft saddles are more comfortable for people who rarely ride, but if you ride more than a couple of times a week you'll want a firm saddle. Soft saddles spread the weight around which is exactly what you don't want, because both men and women have sensitive bits that aren't made for taking pressure. A firm saddle focuses the weight on your "sit bones", which, once conditioned by regular riding, can happily take your weight all day. I've ridden a few centuries, always on hard saddles, so I have a bit of experience with this. A lot of hardcore distance ridders - those who do 24-hour rides and the like - use Brooks saddles, particularly the B17 model. These are hard as a rock.

Gel saddles are the work of the devil.

… engrossed in such factional acts as dreaming different dreams.
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thegelding
feeling my oats
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: there are nice people here...that makes me happy
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2007-06-26, 15:10

how do the components of the scott sub 10 compare to shim 105s?

leaning toward the scott at this moment...second would be the road warrior

g
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AWR
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: State of Flux
 
2007-06-26, 16:22

Quote:
Originally Posted by thegelding View Post
how do the components of the scott sub 10 compare to shim 105s?

leaning toward the scott at this moment...second would be the road warrior

g
Thanks, DG; I will digress on the decision tomorrow - at work!!

Interesting question, g. Some of the bits are a bit nicer, some a bit less so. All said n done, that set up is nice, solid gear.

Do check the stem, though. That said, if you are uncomfortable, these things are usually replaceable with a more appropriate piece, but you might ask if that's the case here.

I would try to ride both bikes before buying; the Road Warrior looks more comfortable as a commuter.
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Perfecting_Zero
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
 
2007-06-26, 16:53

g,

As your typical riding conditions won't favor disc brakes (you mentioned that you live in the desert), you might consider a bike with good rim brakes, and then use the extra money for Shimano 105 components.

AWR has got it just about right, here:

Quote:
I would strongly suggest sticking with Shimano 105 or its equivalent or better. The stuff is lighter and stronger, and stays "tuned" for quite a bit longer than low-end components.

Also, there is a downside to disc brakes: down the road, your upgrade/replacement choices for wheel sets will be very limited compared to the upgrade/replacement choices for wheel sets on rim-brake bikes. Similarly, the prospect of changing out a disc-only fork will reveal two realities: 1) there are just a couple of expensive junk forks out there, and 2) there are even fewer -- and more expensive -- decent disc-only forks out there.

Even though I still advocate disc brakes (when their advantages can be exploited), I thought that it was only fair to sketch out the challenges associated with changing out disc-only forks, wheels... and frames, for that matter.

DG's advice on seat selection -- while it might seem counterintuitive at first -- is spot on, in my experience.

AWR, I LOVE the stealthy look of your BMC! Very cool.

"We do not see things as they are, we see them as we are." Anais Nin
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thegelding
feeling my oats
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: there are nice people here...that makes me happy
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2007-06-26, 17:18

yeah...but the disc brakes just look so cool


plus i've always disliked bike brakes...they seem so...not sure...just they change so much as to what is best...first it is calipers, then center pulls, then a hybrid caliper/center pull thingy...it seems at least disc brakes make sense in that they work and work well in many weather types and situations...


that said, i'm riding a road warrior and then the scott...likely will go with the road warrior, but will get the one that rides nicest...

g

crazy is not a rare human condition

everything is food if you chew hard enough
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Eugene
careful with axes
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Hillsborough, CA
 
2007-06-26, 20:03

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dorian Gray View Post
This is strange advice. Soft saddles are more comfortable for people who rarely ride, but if you ride more than a couple of times a week you'll want a firm saddle. Soft saddles spread the weight around which is exactly what you don't want, because both men and women have sensitive bits that aren't made for taking pressure. A firm saddle focuses the weight on your "sit bones", which, once conditioned by regular riding, can happily take your weight all day. I've ridden a few centuries, always on hard saddles, so I have a bit of experience with this. A lot of hardcore distance ridders - those who do 24-hour rides and the like - use Brooks saddles, particularly the B17 model. These are hard as a rock.
Hardcore riders get hardcore bike seats. I thought we were talking about something less than that? Besides, the people who use stiff saddles generally have padded bike shorts.
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Eugene
careful with axes
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Hillsborough, CA
 
2007-06-26, 20:56

Quote:
Originally Posted by thegelding View Post
yeah...but the disc brakes just look so cool

plus i've always disliked bike brakes...they seem so...not sure...just they change so much as to what is best...first it is calipers, then center pulls, then a hybrid caliper/center pull thingy...it seems at least disc brakes make sense in that they work and work well in many weather types and situations...
The callipers you see on road bikes require the least amount of cable pull, but in turn aren't suited to wide rims. Center-pull callipers require a little bit more cable pull since the cable pull itself is split into a Y, but can accomodate mountain bike rims and such. Vee-brakes like you see on more recent mountain brakes have long arms for the mechanical advantage, but also require even more cable pull than normal brakes...the extra cable slop is mitigated somewhat by better brake lever design.
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beardedmacuser
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: eastmidlandshire
 
2007-06-27, 04:34

Quote:
Originally Posted by Perfecting_Zero View Post
Also, there is a downside to disc brakes: down the road, your upgrade/replacement choices for wheel sets will be very limited compared to the upgrade/replacement choices for wheel sets on rim-brake bikes. Similarly, the prospect of changing out a disc-only fork will reveal two realities: 1) there are just a couple of expensive junk forks out there, and 2) there are even fewer -- and more expensive -- decent disc-only forks out there.
Absolutely. Disc brakes are nothing but an expensive hassle on a commuting/hybrid/road bike. There simply is no need for them. Decent calliper brakes on a decent pair of road wheels will provide more than enough braking performance on the road. In the wet I've never found calliper brakes to be lacking in power. Compared to discs they're cheap, light, easy to maintain, reliable and as Perfecting_Zero said they'll leave you with more options when it comes to hubs and wheels.

On the road; callipers > canti's > discs > teh-crappy-V

Off road; discs > teh-crappy-V > canti's > callipers

But hey, if you like the look of discs on a bike then go for them.

And as they say; brakes just slow you down!
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Partial
Stallion
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Milwaukee
 
2007-06-27, 07:47



That's my road bike. It's impossible to get a good picture of it without it leaning on something. I bought it from bikes direct thus the generic kinesis frame, but the components on it are mid-range since I ride quite a bit(50 miles a week or so)
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Partial
Stallion
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Milwaukee
 
2007-06-27, 07:52

Quote:
Originally Posted by Majost View Post
Dude, helmets do not look tacky. Just wear the damn thing. If you think yours looks tacky, grab a new one. The ones for about $50 nowadays are extraordinarily lightweight, have lots of holes for air, and really don't look bad at all. I *never* leave the house without a helmet.

Then again, I do cycle on the streets of Chicago; an accident is inevitable at some point (I've already gotten hit twice, but they were just sideswipes where I didn't even fall off the bike... I just lost a bit of skin off my knuckles and got really angry at the drivers).
Same here. I am very glad I have had a helmet on several occasions. People do not know how to drive/obey laws in Wisconsin and I have had 3-4 very close encounters of being hit. Sadly enough it is almost always people too overzealous about turning left when I riding through the walk sign.
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macleod
Now in lower-case™!
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
 
2007-08-01, 17:33

My newest road bike: Fuji Team Pro



I got it because I had grown out of my old bike and was due for an upgrade! I wouldn't have ever been talked into buying it until I was offered a huge deal. I got the bike, a Bell Sweep R helmet (for my Dad), a Garmin Edge 305 GPS, and Look Keo Carbon Pedals for $1800. Performance points helped me get all the stuff seeing as they had a special promotion where you got 25% back in points to use in the store. I then sold my old mountain bike (which was sitting unused since I got my first road bike) and my previous road bike to make it basically a $700 bike. It also saved some space in the garage by getting rid of a bike that was no longer being used!

Last edited by macleod : 2007-08-01 at 17:44. Reason: image was messed up...had to host it rather than link it
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gsxrboy
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
 
2007-08-01, 18:44

I ordered a 305 from ebay and am impatiently waiting for it. What do you think of it?
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macleod
Now in lower-case™!
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
 
2007-08-01, 19:00

I haven't had a chance to play with it yet cause I am away from my bike right now and it just now got delivered to my house. The darn thing was not in the store so I had to order it. I will probably get to play with it this weekend though so I will let you know on Saturday or Sunday hopefully.
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gsxrboy
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
 
2007-08-01, 19:13

Cool, thanks. Will you use the standard GTC software or use something like Trailrunner, Trackrunner or Ascent etc.

Murbot, geeeze the news gixxers are slower!!, 290 from my 2000 Y model on the local racetrack during a ride day

Last edited by gsxrboy : 2007-08-01 at 21:11.
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macleod
Now in lower-case™!
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
 
2007-08-01, 19:30

I haven't really researched that much but I am going to start with the GTC software and then maybe look to something else if they have features I want or if I end up not liking the GTC.
I need to research it all before I start. So far I have found Motion Based, Training Peaks and the ones you mentioned. What all is out there and which of them are free? Have we basically mentioned the most popular ones?
The Motion Based free edition seems cool but I wouldn't want to pay $100 a year for the unlimited as opposed to most recent 10 workouts being stored. That is the main difference that I can see. I will probably use the free version of that with GTC.

Last edited by macleod : 2007-08-01 at 19:40.
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Partial
Stallion
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Milwaukee
 
2007-08-02, 02:36

Macleod, is that an ultegra set-up? Looks like a hell of a bike!
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Koodari
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
 
2007-08-02, 03:07

Quote:
Originally Posted by tensdanny38 View Post
Same here. I am very glad I have had a helmet on several occasions. People do not know how to drive/obey laws in Wisconsin and I have had 3-4 very close encounters of being hit. Sadly enough it is almost always people too overzealous about turning left when I riding through the walk sign.
My two closest calls have been in this precise situation.

In fact it was two different times, the very same intersection (no, the visibility is excellent, that's not the reason), and the drivers were both middle-aged guys with a mobile phone glued to their ear. I went down both times from braking and evading. As soon as it was evident that I wasn't damaged - never mind that they couldn't have known if my bike is - these folks drove on and IIRC still had the phone on their ear.

I no longer have business at the other end of that route, so I haven't ridden much in this area anymore. I was this close >< to carrying a huge ball bearing in pocket while riding in case of a third jerk doing the same thing. Who knows, losing a rear window might even make them get off the phone.

We don't have punitive damages so it's no use crashing them and suing, either.
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macleod
Now in lower-case™!
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
 
2007-08-02, 07:45

Quote:
Originally Posted by tensdanny38 View Post
Macleod, is that an ultegra set-up? Looks like a hell of a bike!
Yeah it is pretty much all Ultegra. The only things that aren't Ultegra are the Dura Ace rear derailleur and the FSA Team Issue Carbon MegaExo. I really like the wheelset thus far, Shimano R-550. The bike is great though. I love it. It is a little overkill for me but I couldn't really turn it down when I realized what I could sell my other bikes for and what I could get with all the Performance Points I got.
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macleod
Now in lower-case™!
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
 
2007-08-05, 17:02

I tested the Edge 305 this weekend. Unfortunately I only got one ride in because of weather/exhaustion from water skiing. Overall I really like it. GTC does enough for me but I will probably use the Motion Based free account as well. I got the HRM option and the cadence option. The wheel speed sensor was working fine but because of the shape of my bike the cadence sensor was too fra from the magnet on the crank so that wasn't working. Also I couldn't get the HRM to work so I just rode without it and will play with it later. All in all it was accurate (judging against the cyclometer that was on my Dad's bike when he rode with me) and it was easy to setup. It suggests that you use the wedge if mounting it on your stem but that made it too tall for my taste so I left that off. If you have any questions let me know and I can try to answer them. I would really recommend it though so I think you will like it a lot!
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Bryson
Rocket Surgeon
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Whitby
 
2007-08-05, 17:24

Dammit. Just went out in the garden and it appears that I have a flat. I must have done it on the way home yesterday, but I certainly don't remember doing it.

Puncture repairs are sooooooo dull....
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Majost
monkey with a tiny cymbal
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Lost
 
2007-08-05, 20:55

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bryson View Post
Dammit. Just went out in the garden and it appears that I have a flat. I must have done it on the way home yesterday, but I certainly don't remember doing it.

Puncture repairs are sooooooo dull....
You still patch? Oy. I figure at $3 a pop, it's well worth my money to just grab a new tube. Yeah, sure, it's wasteful, but I just hate fixing a flat only to discover a second hole. Or that the patch didn't sit correctly.
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Hassan i Sabbah
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: london and københavn
 
2007-08-07, 04:09

I’ve just moved to Copenhagen. I've made some fascinating discoveries.

I ride, I realise, like a Londoner: that is, a weathered and seasoned hybrid of ‘motherfucker’ and ‘show-off’.

I could write an essay about the awesome joy of living in a place where cycle paths are an integral part of the infrastructure, complete with lights and crossings, where there’s a bike shop on every corner, where you can go to a restaurant and prop your machine against a tree, lock the wheels and not worry about it being stolen in minutes. (This is utterly inconceivable to me, I still haven’t got my head round that.)

But here I feel like… a cycle messenger who had to make a delivery from London and decided to stay. When I ride with my girlfriend, I ride Danish. Or Danish-ish. When I ride on my own, I am a heroic shit-head, and it’s very obvious.

Here’s the deal. I’ve been cycling in London for a long time. I have a courier’s bike (an Italian-built Sigma frame with Deda carbon post and triangle, Look forks, Ultegra gears and brakes, Campag bits and bobs) with sawn-off flat bars, the better to weave in and out of double decker busses down the Dalston Highroad.

I have a low riding position. I ignore traffic lights; they are gay. When I have to stop, I balance on the spot with chain tension. I’ll ride against traffic without a second thought. I don’t care if it’s a one way street.

Where I come from, this is perfectly normal.

Here… people don’t do that. They stop at lights even if there’s nothing coming. Even if the lights are on a cycle path. They ride upright city bikes; even the men. They don’t race each other. They don’t do bunnyhops over the kerb. They don’t shout at the idiot car driver who just pulled out without looking or made a right turn without signalling. They don’t need to; they’re not constantly scared. I’ve been here a week, and I haven’t been anywhere close to death. Here people hold hands when they ride. Even I’ve done this.

It is AWESOME. Here my usual riding practices generate stares (the Danish, for all their commendable qualities, are very skilled self-policers) and I feel like a glorious rebel cycle-psycho.

But only when my girlfriend’s at work.

gibberish
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